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Dear Stakeholders,

We would like to thank for your participation in the contest “WSIS Project Prizes 2013”. We would like to inform you that your submission has been correctly registered in the system.

Please, note that only projects that were submitted according to the general rules of the contest will be qualified for the second phase. In this context we will be currently in the process of revision. In case of need some of you will be contacted on bilateral basis.

The list of projects will be published as soon as revision process is completed and not later than 15 February 2013.

With kind regards,
WSIS Team

WSIS Project Prizes is a unique recognition for excellence in the implementation of WSIS outcomes.

The WSIS Project Prizes 2014 contest provides a platform to identify and showcase success stories and models that could be easily replicated; empower communities at the local level; give a chance to all stakeholders working on WSIS to participate in the contest, and particularly recognize the efforts of stakeholders for their added value to the society and commitment towards achieving WSIS goals.

Submit your application for the contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2014 until 1st November 2013!

It is important to win this contest because it gives official recognition to your work and confirms that you are doing the right thing. In the case of Child Helpline International, the WSIS prize gave us great motivation to keep engaging with the ITU and its members around the world in order to empower children and young people and to giving them a voice through communication technologies. Mr. Thomas Mueller,
Deputy Head of Programmes, Child Helpline International

The contest and the prize were definitive to show our stakeholders the relevance of our project, make it bigger and to multiply our budget. Mr. Santiago Amador,
Director of ICT Adoption and Access, Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, Colombia

Receiving the 2013 WSIS Project Prize was a tremendous honour and important recognition that public libraries are powerful partners in development. Winning such an esteemed prize gave us extra validation that our innovative approach connecting libraries with technology is working. Ms. Rima Kupryte,
Director of EIFL, Italy

The victory of the Electronic licensing of Kazakhstan in the international WSIS Project Prizes 2013 competition served as a great incentive and became the pride of the entire project team, including both public authorities and the business community. High score of this national project allows to demonstrate our project on the international arena. After receiving the award, the experts from several countries visited Kazakhstan for the purpose of learning more of our experience in introducing the project and plans for further development. We would be very glad if other Kazakhstan projects would take part in this important competition in future. Mr. Ruslan Ensebayev,
Chairman of the Board, NITEC, Kazakhstan

About

WSIS Project Prizes is an immediate response to the requests expressed by WSIS stakeholders during the WSIS Forum 2011: to create a mechanism to evaluate and reward stakeholders for their efforts in the implementation of WSIS outcomes. The WSIS Project Prizes are an integral part of the WSIS Stocktaking Process that was set up in 2004 (Para 120, Tunis Agenda).

The contest of WSIS Project Prizes is open to all stakeholders: governments, private sector, civil society, international organizations, academia and others. The contest comprises 18 categories that are directly linked to the WSIS Action Lines outlined in the Geneva Plan of Action.

The contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2014 is organized into four phases to be held from 5 September 2013. 18 winners of WSIS Project Prizes will be honored, recognized and presented with an award during WSIS Project Prizes 2014 Ceremony at the WSIS+10 High-Level Event.

The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolution 2012/5 "Assessment of the progress made in the implementation of and follow up to the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society" reiterates the importance of sharing the best practices at the global level, and while recognizing excellence in the implementation of the projects and initiatives which further the WSIS goals, encourages all stakeholders to nominate their projects to the annual WSIS Project Prizes, as an integral part of the WSIS Stocktaking process, while noting the report on the WSIS Success Stories.

Please do not hesitate to contact the WSIS Stocktaking Team at wsis-prizes@itu.int for any further questions or need for assistance.

For more information regarding previous contest of WSIS Project Prizes, you are kindly invited to visit WSIS Project Prizes 2012 and WSIS Project Prizes 2013 portals.

Background

The contest is organized into four phases:

Responding to the requests of several stakeholders, the timeline for the contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2014 was updated:

  1. The first phase: Project submission

    Submission of project descriptions.

    5 September – 1 November 2013 (Deadline for last submission: 23:00 Geneva time)
    [ar] - [zh] - [en] - [fr] - [es] - [ru]

    Responding to the requests of several stakeholders, the deadline is extended until 15th December 2013 (non-extendable)

  2. The second phase: Nomination Phase

    The Revision of submitted projects by Expert Group that will result with a list of nominated projects.

    16 December 2013 - 30 January 2014

  3. The third phase: Public Online Voting

    17 February - 18 April 2014 (Deadline for casting last vote: 23:00 Geneva time)

    The list of nominated projects will be available online on 17 February 2014.

  4. The fourth phase: Announcement of winners

    Announcement of winners to the public during WSIS Project Prizes 2014 Ceremony at WSIS+10 High-Level Event 2014, and the release of publication "WSIS Stocktaking: Success Stories 2014", which is a compilation of extended descriptions of the 18 winning projects.

Categories

The 18 categories *of the WSIS Project Prizes 2014 are linked to the WSIS Action Lines outlined in the Geneva Plan of Action.

*WSIS Action Line C7 is separated into 8 individual categories in-line with the ICT applications sectors.

  • C1. The role of governments and all stakeholders in the promotion of ICTs for development

    The effective participation of governments and all stakeholders is vital in developing the Information Society requiring cooperation and partnerships among all of them.

    1. Development of national e-strategies, including the necessary human capacity building, should be encouraged by all countries by 2005, taking into account different national circumstances.
    2. Initiate at the national level a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders, including through public/private partnerships, in devising e-strategies for the Information Society and for the exchange of best practices.
    3. In developing and implementing national e-strategies, stakeholders should take into consideration local, regional and national needs and concerns. To maximize the benefits of initiatives undertaken, these should include the concept of sustainability. The private sector should be engaged in concrete projects to develop the Information Society at local, regional and national levels.
    4. Each country is encouraged to establish at least one functioning Public/Private Partnership (PPP) or Multi-Sector Partnership (MSP), by 2005 as a showcase for future action.
    5. Identify mechanisms, at the national, regional and international levels, for the initiation and promotion of partnerships among stakeholders of the Information Society.
    6. Explore the viability of establishing multi-stakeholder portals for indigenous peoples at the national level.
    7. By 2005, relevant international organizations and financial institutions should develop their own strategies for the use of ICTs for sustainable development, including sustainable production and consumption patterns and as an effective instrument to help achieve the goals expressed in the United Nations Millennium Declaration.
    8. International organizations should publish, in their areas of competence, including on their website, reliable information submitted by relevant stakeholders on successful experiences of mainstreaming ICTs.
    9. Encourage a series of related measures, including, among other things: incubator schemes, venture capital investments (national and international), government investment funds (including micro-finance for Small, Medium-sized and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs), investment promotion strategies, software export support activities (trade counseling), support of research and development networks and software parks.
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  • C2. Information and communication infrastructure: an essential foundation for the Information Society

    Infrastructure is central in achieving the goal of digital inclusion, enabling universal, sustainable, ubiquitous and affordable access to ICTs by all, taking into account relevant solutions already in place in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, to provide sustainable connectivity and access to remote and marginalized areas at national and regional levels.

    1. Governments should take action, in the framework of national development policies, in order to support an enabling and competitive environment for the necessary investment in ICT infrastructure and for the development of new services.
    2. In the context of national e-strategies, devise appropriate universal access policies and strategies, and their means of implementation, in line with the indicative targets, and develop ICT connectivity indicators.
    3. In the context of national e-strategies, provide and improve ICT connectivity for all schools, universities, health institutions, libraries, post offices, community centres, museums and other institutions accessible to the public, in line with the indicative targets.
    4. Develop and strengthen national, regional and international broadband network infrastructure, including delivery by satellite and other systems, to help in providing the capacity to match the needs of countries and their citizens and for the delivery of new ICT-based services. Support technical, regulatory and operational studies by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and, as appropriate, other relevant international organizations in order to:
      1. broaden access to orbital resources, global frequency harmonization and global systems standardization;
      2. encourage public/private partnership;
      3. promote the provision of global high-speed satellite services for underserved areas such as remote and sparsely populated areas;
      4. explore other systems that can provide high-speed connectivity.
    5. In the context of national e-strategies, address the special requirements of older people, persons with disabilities, children, especially marginalized children and other disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, including by appropriate educational administrative and legislative measures to ensure their full inclusion in the Information Society.
    6. Encourage the design and production of ICT equipment and services so that everyone, has easy and affordable access to them including older people, persons with disabilities, children, especially marginalized children, and other disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, and promote the development of technologies, applications, and content suited to their needs, guided by the Universal Design Principle and further enhanced by the use of assistive technologies.
    7. In order to alleviate the challenges of illiteracy, develop affordable technologies and non-text based computer interfaces to facilitate people's access to ICT.
    8. Undertake international research and development efforts aimed at making available adequate and affordable ICT equipment for end users.
    9. Encourage the use of unused wireless capacity, including satellite, in developed countries and in particular in developing countries, to provide access in remote areas, especially in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, and to improve low-cost connectivity in developing countries. Special concern should be given to the Least Developed Countries in their efforts in establishing telecommunication infrastructure.
    10. Optimize connectivity among major information networks by encouraging the creation and development of regional ICT backbones and Internet exchange points, to reduce interconnection costs and broaden network access.
    11. Develop strategies for increasing affordable global connectivity, thereby facilitating improved access. Commercially negotiated Internet transit and interconnection costs should be oriented towards objective, transparent and non-discriminatory parameters, taking into account ongoing work on this subject.
    12. Encourage and promote joint use of traditional media and new technologies.
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  • C3. Access to information and Knowledge

    ICTs allow people, anywhere in the world, to access information and knowledge almost instantaneously. Individuals, organizations and communities should benefit from access to knowledge and information.

    1. Develop policy guidelines for the development and promotion of public domain information as an important international instrument promoting public access to information.
    2. Governments are encouraged to provide adequate access through various communication resources, notably the Internet, to public official information. Establishing legislation on access to information and the preservation of public data, notably in the area of the new technologies, is encouraged.
    3. Promote research and development to facilitate accessibility of ICTs for all, including disadvantaged, marginalized and vulnerable groups.
    4. Governments, and other stakeholders, should establish sustainable multi-purpose community public access points, providing affordable or free-of-charge access for their citizens to the various communication resources, notably the Internet. These access points should, to the extent possible, have sufficient capacity to provide assistance to users, in libraries, educational institutions, public administrations, post offices or other public places, with special emphasis on rural and underserved areas, while respecting intellectual property rights (IPRs) and encouraging the use of information and sharing of knowledge.
    5. Encourage research and promote awareness among all stakeholders of the possibilities offered by different software models, and the means of their creation, including proprietary, open-source and free software, in order to increase competition, freedom of choice and affordability, and to enable all stakeholders to evaluate which solution best meets their requirements.
    6. Governments should actively promote the use of ICTs as a fundamental working tool by their citizens and local authorities. In this respect, the international community and other stakeholders should support capacity building for local authorities in the widespread use of ICTs as a means of improving local governance.
    7. Encourage research on the Information Society, including on innovative forms of networking, adaptation of ICT infrastructure, tools and applications that facilitate accessibility of ICTs for all, and disadvantaged groups in particular.
    8. Support the creation and development of a digital public library and archive services, adapted to the Information Society, including reviewing national library strategies and legislation, developing a global understanding of the need for "hybrid libraries", and fostering worldwide cooperation between libraries.
    9. Encourage initiatives to facilitate access, including free and affordable access to open access journals and books, and open archives for scientific information.
    10. Support research and development of the design of useful instruments for all stakeholders to foster increased awareness, assessment, and evaluation of different software models and licences, so as to ensure an optimal choice of appropriate software that will best contribute to achieving development goals within local conditions.
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  • C4. Capacity Building

    Everyone should have the necessary skills to benefit fully from the Information Society. Therefore capacity building and ICT literacy are essential. ICTs can contribute to achieving universal education worldwide, through delivery of education and training of teachers, and offering improved conditions for lifelong learning, encompassing people that are outside the formal education process, and improving professional skills.

    1. Develop domestic policies to ensure that ICTs are fully integrated in education and training at all levels, including in curriculum development, teacher training, institutional administration and management, and in support of the concept of lifelong learning.
    2. Develop and promote programmes to eradicate illiteracy using ICTs at national, regional and international levels.
    3. Promote e-literacy skills for all, for example by designing and offering courses for public administration, taking advantage of existing facilities such as libraries, multipurpose community centres, public access points and by establishing local ICT training centres with the cooperation of all stakeholders. Special attention should be paid to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.
    4. In the context of national educational policies, and taking into account the need to eradicate adult illiteracy, ensure that young people are equipped with knowledge and skills to use ICTs, including the capacity to analyse and treat information in creative and innovative ways, share their expertise and participate fully in the Information Society.
    5. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should create programmes for capacity building with an emphasis on creating a critical mass of qualified and skilled ICT professionals and experts.
    6. Develop pilot projects to demonstrate the impact of ICT-based alternative educational delivery systems, notably for achieving Education for All targets, including basic literacy targets.
    7. Work on removing the gender barriers to ICT education and training and promoting equal training opportunities in ICT-related fields for women and girls. Early intervention programmes in science and technology should target young girls with the aim of increasing the number of women in ICT careers. Promote the exchange of best practices on the integration of gender perspectives in ICT education.
    8. Empower local communities, especially those in rural and underserved areas, in ICT use and promote the production of useful and socially meaningful content for the benefit of all.
    9. Launch education and training programmes, where possible using information networks of traditional nomadic and indigenous peoples, which provide opportunities to fully participate in the Information Society.
    10. Design and implement regional and international cooperation activities to enhance the capacity, notably, of leaders and operational staff in developing countries and LDCs, to apply ICTs effectively in the whole range of educational activities. This should include delivery of education outside the educational structure, such as the workplace and at home.
    11. Design specific training programmes in the use of ICTs in order to meet the educational needs of information professionals, such as archivists, librarians, museum professionals, scientists, teachers, journalists, postal workers and other relevant professional groups. Training of information professionals should focus not only on new methods and techniques for the development and provision of information and communication services, but also on relevant management skills to ensure the best use of technologies. Training of teachers should focus on the technical aspects of ICTs, on development of content, and on the potential possibilities and challenges of ICTs.
    12. Develop distance learning, training and other forms of education and training as part of capacity building programmes. Give special attention to developing countries and especially LDCs in different levels of human resources development.
    13. Promote international and regional cooperation in the field of capacity building, including country programmes developed by the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies.
    14. Launch pilot projects to design new forms of ICT-based networking, linking education, training and research institutions between and among developed and developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
    15. Volunteering, if conducted in harmony with national policies and local cultures, can be a valuable asset for raising human capacity to make productive use of ICT tools and build a more inclusive Information Society. Activate volunteer programmes to provide capacity building on ICT for development, particularly in developing countries.
    16. Design programmes to train users to develop self-learning and self-development capacities.
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  • C5. Building confidence and security in the use of ICTs

    Confidence and security are among the main pillars of the Information Society.

    1. Promote cooperation among the governments at the United Nations and with all stakeholders at other appropriate fora to enhance user confidence, build trust, and protect both data and network integrity; consider existing and potential threats to ICTs; and address other information security and network security issues.
    2. Governments, in cooperation with the private sector, should prevent, detect and respond to cyber-crime and misuse of ICTs by: developing guidelines that take into account ongoing efforts in these areas; considering legislation that allows for effective investigation and prosecution of misuse; promoting effective mutual assistance efforts; strengthening institutional support at the international level for preventing, detecting and recovering from such incidents; and encouraging education and raising awareness.
    3. Governments, and other stakeholders, should actively promote user education and awareness about online privacy and the means of protecting privacy.
    4. Take appropriate action on spam at national and international levels.
    5. Encourage the domestic assessment of national law with a view to overcoming any obstacles to the effective use of electronic documents and transactions including electronic means of authentication.
    6. Further strengthen the trust and security framework with complementary and mutually reinforcing initiatives in the fields of security in the use of ICTs, with initiatives or guidelines with respect to rights to privacy, data and consumer protection.
    7. Share good practices in the field of information security and network security and encourage their use by all parties concerned.
    8. Invite interested countries to set up focal points for real-time incident handling and response, and develop a cooperative network between these focal points for sharing information and technologies on incident response.
    9. Encourage further development of secure and reliable applications to facilitate online transactions.
    10. Encourage interested countries to contribute actively to the ongoing United Nations activities to build confidence and security in the use of ICTs.
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  • C6. Enabling environment

    Confidence and security are among the main pillars of the Information Society.

    1. Governments should foster a supportive, transparent, pro-competitive and predictable policy, legal and regulatory framework, which provides the appropriate incentives to investment and community development in the Information Society.
    2. We ask the Secretary General of the United Nations to set up a working group on Internet governance, in an open and inclusive process that ensures a mechanism for the full and active participation of governments, the private sector and civil society from both developing and developed countries, involving relevant intergovernmental and international organizations and forums, to investigate and make proposals for action, as appropriate, on the governance of Internet by 2005. The group should, inter alia:
      1. develop a working definition of Internet governance;
      2. identify the public policy issues that are relevant to Internet governance;
      3. develop a common understanding of the respective roles and responsibilities of governments, existing intergovernmental and international organisations and other forums as well as the private sector and civil society from both developing and developed countries;
      4. prepare a report on the results of this activity to be presented for consideration and appropriate action for the second phase of WSIS in Tunis in 2005.
    3. Governments are invited to:
      1. facilitate the establishment of national and regional Internet Exchange Centres;
      2. manage or supervise, as appropriate, their respective country code top-level domain name (ccTLD);
      3. promote awareness of the Internet.
    4. In cooperation with the relevant stakeholders, promote regional root servers and the use of internationalized domain names in order to overcome barriers to access.
    5. Governments should continue to update their domestic consumer protection laws to respond to the new requirements of the Information Society.
    6. Promote effective participation by developing countries and countries with economies in transition in international ICT forums and create opportunities for exchange of experience.
    7. Governments need to formulate national strategies, which include e-government strategies, to make public administration more transparent, efficient and democratic.
    8. Develop a framework for the secure storage and archival of documents and other electronic records of information.
    9. Governments and stakeholders should actively promote user education and awareness about online privacy and the means of protecting privacy.
    10. Invite stakeholders to ensure that practices designed to facilitate electronic commerce also permit consumers to have a choice as to whether or not to use electronic communication.
    11. Encourage the ongoing work in the area of effective dispute settlement systems, notably alternative dispute resolution (ADR), which can promote settlement of disputes.
    12. Governments, in collaboration with stakeholders, are encouraged to formulate conducive ICT policies that foster entrepreneurship, innovation and investment, and with particular reference to the promotion of participation by women.
    13. Recognising the economic potential of ICTs for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), they should be assisted in increasing their competitiveness by streamlining administrative procedures, facilitating their access to capital and enhancing their capacity to participate in ICT-related projects.
    14. Governments should act as model users and early adopters of e-commerce in accordance with their level of socio-economic development.
    15. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should raise awareness of the importance of international interoperability standards for global e-commerce.
    16. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should promote the development and use of open, interoperable, non-discriminatory and demand-driven standards.
    17. ITU, pursuant to its treaty capacity, coordinates and allocates frequencies with the goal of facilitating ubiquitous and affordable access.
    18. Additional steps should be taken in ITU and other regional organisations to ensure rational, efficient and economical use of, and equitable access to, the radio-frequency spectrum by all countries, based on relevant international agreements.
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  • C7. ICT applications: benefits in all aspects of life

    ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agricultureand sciencewithin the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sectors:

    • E-government

      1. Implement e-government strategies focusing on applications aimed at innovating and promoting transparency in public administrations and democratic processes, improving efficiency and strengthening relations with citizens.
      2. Develop national e-government initiatives and services, at all levels, adapted to the needs of citizens and business, to achieve a more efficient allocation of resources and public goods.
      3. Support international cooperation initiatives in the field of e-government, in order to enhance transparency, accountability and efficiency at all levels of government.
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    • E-business

      1. Governments, international organizations and the private sector, are encouraged to promote the benefits of international trade and the use of e-business, and promote the use of e-business models in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
      2. Through the adoption of an enabling environment, and based on widely available Internet access, governments should seek to stimulate private sector investment, foster new applications, content development and public/private partnerships.
      3. Government policies should favour assistance to, and growth of SMMEs, in the ICT industry, as well as their entry into e-business, to stimulate economic growth and job creation as an element of a strategy for poverty reduction through wealth creation.
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    • E-learning

      Everyone should have the necessary skills to benefit fully from the Information Society. Therefore capacity building and ICT literacy are essential. ICTs can contribute to achieving universal education worldwide, through delivery of education and training of teachers, and offering improved conditions for lifelong learning, encompassing people that are outside the formal education process, and improving professional skills.

      1. Develop domestic policies to ensure that ICTs are fully integrated in education and training at all levels, including in curriculum development, teacher training, institutional administration and management, and in support of the concept of lifelong learning.
      2. Develop and promote programmes to eradicate illiteracy using ICTs at national, regional and international levels.
      3. Promote e-literacy skills for all, for example by designing and offering courses for public administration, taking advantage of existing facilities such as libraries, multipurpose community centres, public access points and by establishing local ICT training centres with the cooperation of all stakeholders. Special attention should be paid to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.
      4. In the context of national educational policies, and taking into account the need to eradicate adult illiteracy, ensure that young people are equipped with knowledge and skills to use ICTs, including the capacity to analyse and treat information in creative and innovative ways, share their expertise and participate fully in the Information Society.
      5. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should create programmes for capacity building with an emphasis on creating a critical mass of qualified and skilled ICT professionals and experts.
      6. Develop pilot projects to demonstrate the impact of ICT-based alternative educational delivery systems, notably for achieving Education for All targets, including basic literacy targets.
      7. Work on removing the gender barriers to ICT education and training and promoting equal training opportunities in ICT-related fields for women and girls. Early intervention programmes in science and technology should target young girls with the aim of increasing the number of women in ICT careers. Promote the exchange of best practices on the integration of gender perspectives in ICT education.
      8. Empower local communities, especially those in rural and underserved areas, in ICT use and promote the production of useful and socially meaningful content for the benefit of all.
      9. Launch education and training programmes, where possible using information networks of traditional nomadic and indigenous peoples, which provide opportunities to fully participate in the Information Society.
      10. Design and implement regional and international cooperation activities to enhance the capacity, notably, of leaders and operational staff in developing countries and LDCs, to apply ICTs effectively in the whole range of educational activities. This should include delivery of education outside the educational structure, such as the workplace and at home.
      11. Design specific training programmes in the use of ICTs in order to meet the educational needs of information professionals, such as archivists, librarians, museum professionals, scientists, teachers, journalists, postal workers and other relevant professional groups. Training of information professionals should focus not only on new methods and techniques for the development and provision of information and communication services, but also on relevant management skills to ensure the best use of technologies. Training of teachers should focus on the technical aspects of ICTs, on development of content, and on the potential possibilities and challenges of ICTs.
      12. Develop distance learning, training and other forms of education and training as part of capacity building programmes. Give special attention to developing countries and especially LDCs in different levels of human resources development.
      13. Promote international and regional cooperation in the field of capacity building, including country programmes developed by the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies.
      14. Launch pilot projects to design new forms of ICT-based networking, linking education, training and research institutions between and among developed and developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
      15. Volunteering, if conducted in harmony with national policies and local cultures, can be a valuable asset for raising human capacity to make productive use of ICT tools and build a more inclusive Information Society. Activate volunteer programmes to provide capacity building on ICT for development, particularly in developing countries.
      16. Design programmes to train users to develop self-learning and self-development capacities.
      Top
    • E-health

      1. Promote collaborative efforts of governments, planners, health professionals, and other agencies along with the participation of international organizations for creating a reliable, timely, high quality and affordable health care and health information systems and for promoting continuous medical training, education, and research through the use of ICTs, while respecting and protecting citizens' right to privacy.
      2. Facilitate access to the world's medical knowledge and locally-relevant content resources for strengthening public health research and prevention programmes and promoting women's and men's health, such as content on sexual and reproductive health and sexually transmitted infections, and for diseases that attract full attention of the world including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis.
      3. Alert, monitor and control the spread of communicable diseases, through the improvement of common information systems.
      4. Promote the development of international standards for the exchange of health data, taking due account of privacy concerns.
      5. Encourage the adoption of ICTs to improve and extend health care and health information systems to remote and underserved areas and vulnerable populations, recognising women's roles as health providers in their families and communities.
      6. Strengthen and expand ICT-based initiatives for providing medical and humanitarian assistance in disasters and emergencies.
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    • E-employment

      1. Encourage the development of best practices for e-workers and e-employers built, at the national level, on principles of fairness and gender equality, respecting all relevant international norms.
      2. Promote new ways of organizing work and business with the aim of raising productivity, growth and well-being through investment in ICTs and human resources.
      3. Promote teleworking to allow citizens, particularly in the developing countries, LDCs, and small economies, to live in their societies and work anywhere, and to increase employment opportunities for women, and for those with disabilities. In promoting teleworking, special attention should be given to strategies promoting job creation and the retention of the skilled working force.
      4. Promote early intervention programmes in science and technology that should target young girls to increase the number of women in ICT carriers.
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    • E-environment

      1. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders are encouraged to use and promote ICTs as an instrument for environmental protection and the sustainable use of natural resources.
      2. Government, civil society and the private sector are encouraged to initiate actions and implement projects and programmes for sustainable production and consumption and the environmentally safe disposal and recycling of discarded hardware and components used in ICTs.
      3. Establish monitoring systems, using ICTs, to forecast and monitor the impact of natural and man-made disasters, particularly in developing countries, LDCs and small economies.
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    • E-agriculture

      1. Ensure the systematic dissemination of information using ICTs on agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries, forestry and food, in order to provide ready access to comprehensive, up-to-date and detailed knowledge and information, particularly in rural areas.
      2. Public-private partnerships should seek to maximize the use of ICTs as an instrument to improve production (quantity and quality).
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    • E-science

      1. Promote affordable and reliable high-speed Internet connection for all universities and research institutions to support their critical role in information and knowledge production, education and training, and to support the establishment of partnerships, cooperation and networking between these institutions.
      2. Promote electronic publishing, differential pricing and open access initiatives to make scientific information affordable and accessible in all countries on an equitable basis.
      3. Promote the use of peer-to-peer technology to share scientific knowledge and pre-prints and reprints written by scientific authors who have waived their right to payment.
      4. Promote the long-term systematic and efficient collection, dissemination and preservation of essential scientific digital data, for example, population and meteorological data in all countries.
      5. Promote principles and metadata standards to facilitate cooperation and effective use of collected scientific information and data as appropriate to conduct scientific research.
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  • C8. Cultural diversity and identity, linguistic diversity and local content

    Cultural and linguistic diversity, while stimulating respect for cultural identity, traditions and religions, is essential to the development of an Information Society based on the dialogue among cultures and regional and international cooperation. It is an important factor for sustainable development.

    1. Create policies that support the respect, preservation, promotion and enhancement of cultural and linguistic diversity and cultural heritage within the Information Society, as reflected in relevant agreed United Nations documents, including UNESCO's Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. This includes encouraging governments to design cultural policies to promote the production of cultural, educational and scientific content and the development of local cultural industries suited to the linguistic and cultural context of the users.
    2. Develop national policies and laws to ensure that libraries, archives, museums and other cultural institutions can play their full role of content - including traditional knowledge - providers in the Information Society, more particularly by providing continued access to recorded information.
    3. Support efforts to develop and use ICTs for the preservation of natural and, cultural heritage, keeping it accessible as a living part of today's culture. This includes developing systems for ensuring continued access to archived digital information and multimedia content in digital repositories, and support archives, cultural collections and libraries as the memory of humankind.
    4. Develop and implement policies that preserve, affirm, respect and promote diversity of cultural expression and indigenous knowledge and traditions through the creation of varied information content and the use of different methods, including the digitization of the educational, scientific and cultural heritage.
    5. Support local content development, translation and adaptation, digital archives, and diverse forms of digital and traditional media by local authorities. These activities can also strengthen local and indigenous communities.
    6. Provide content that is relevant to the cultures and languages of individuals in the Information Society, through access to traditional and digital media services.
    7. Through public/private partnerships, foster the creation of varied local and national content, including that available in the language of users, and give recognition and support to ICT-based work in all artistic fields.
    8. Strengthen programmes focused on gender-sensitive curricula in formal and non-formal education for all and enhancing communication and media literacy for women with a view to building the capacity of girls and women to understand and to develop ICT content.
    9. Nurture the local capacity for the creation and distribution of software in local languages, as well as content that is relevant to different segments of population, including non-literate, persons with disabilities, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups especially in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
    10. Give support to media based in local communities and support projects combining the use of traditional media and new technologies for their role in facilitating the use of local languages, for documenting and preserving local heritage, including landscape and biological diversity, and as a means to reach rural and isolated and nomadic communities.
    11. Enhance the capacity of indigenous peoples to develop content in their own languages.
    12. Cooperate with indigenous peoples and traditional communities to enable them to more effectively use and benefit from the use of their traditional knowledge in the Information Society.
    13. Exchange knowledge, experiences and best practices on policies and tools designed to promote cultural and linguistic diversity at regional and sub-regional levels. This can be achieved by establishing regional, and sub-regional working groups on specific issues of this Plan of Action to foster integration efforts.
    14. Assess at the regional level the contribution of ICT to cultural exchange and interaction, and based on the outcome of this assessment, design relevant programmes.
    15. Governments, through public/private partnerships, should promote technologies and R&D programmes in such areas as translation, iconographies, voice-assisted services and the development of necessary hardware and a variety of software models, including proprietary, open source software and free software, such as standard character sets, language codes, electronic dictionaries, terminology and thesauri, multilingual search engines, machine translation tools, internationalized domain names, content referencing as well as general and application software.
    Top
  • C9. Media

    The media—in their various forms and with a diversity of ownership—as an actor, have an essential role in the development of the Information Society and are recognized as an important contributor to freedom of expression and plurality of information.

    1. Encourage the media - print and broadcast as well as new media - to continue to play an important role in the Information Society.
    2. Encourage the development of domestic legislation that guarantees the independence and plurality of the media.
    3. Take appropriate measures - consistent with freedom of expression - to combat illegal and harmful content in media content.
    4. Encourage media professionals in developed countries to establish partnerships and networks with the media in developing ones, especially in the field of training.
    5. Promote balanced and diverse portrayals of women and men by the media.
    6. Reduce international imbalances affecting the media, particularly as regards infrastructure, technical resources and the development of human skills, taking full advantage of ICT tools in this regard.
    7. Encourage traditional media to bridge the knowledge divide and to facilitate the flow of cultural content, particularly in rural areas.
    Top
  • C10. Ethical dimensions of the Information Society

    The Information Society should be subject to universally held values and promote the common good and to prevent abusive uses of ICTs.

    1. Take steps to promote respect for peace and to uphold the fundamental values of freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, shared responsibility, and respect for nature.
    2. All stakeholders should increase their awareness of the ethical dimension of their use of ICTs.
    3. All actors in the Information Society should promote the common good, protect privacy and personal data and take appropriate actions and preventive measures, as determined by law, against abusive uses of ICTs such as illegal and other acts motivated by racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance, hatred, violence, all forms of child abuse, including paedophilia and child pornography, and trafficking in, and exploitation of, human beings.
    4. Invite relevant stakeholders, especially the academia, to continue research on ethical dimensions of ICTs.
    Top
  • C11. International and regional cooperation

    International cooperation among all stakeholders is vital in implementation of this plan of action and needs to be strengthened with a view to promoting universal access and bridging the digital divide, inter alia, by provision of means of implementation

    1. Governments of developing countries should raise the relative priority of ICT projects in requests for international cooperation and assistance on infrastructure development projects from developed countries and international financial organizations.
    2. Within the context of the UN's Global Compact and building upon the United Nations Millennium Declaration, build on and accelerate public-private partnerships, focusing on the use of ICT in development.
    3. Invite international and regional organizations to mainstream ICTs in their work programmes and to assist all levels of developing countries, to be involved in the preparation and implementation of national action plans to support the fulfilment of the goals indicated in the declaration of principles and in this Plan of Action, taking into account the importance of regional initiatives.
    Top

Rules and Guidelines

Rules and guidelines for voting phase

  1. The winners are selected based on the appreciation/voting of projects by WSIS stakeholders representing WSIS online network. The stakeholders are invited to appreciate/vote for projects in all 17 categories.
  2. Only registered members of the WSIS Stocktaking Platform (STK) with requested complete information may vote for/appreciate a project. The information should contain organization details: name, type, country and user details: username and e-mail
  3. Entities are not allowed to vote for/appreciate their own project
  4. Votes/appreciations of all STK members are weighted equally
  5. Each STK member may only vote for/appreciate one project in each category
  6. The winner of each category will be the project that is voted for/appreciated the most by STK members
  7. Stakeholders should complete the voting process by voting in each category (in total 17)
  8. WSIS Stocktaking reserves the right to use the entity (organization) details submitted by stakeholders

Rules and guidelines for submission phase

  1. All projects must be submitted through the online questionnaire.
  2. For each project submission only one category should be selected, out of 18 categories.
  3. Each entity could submit one project per each category
  4. The same project may not be submitted twice.
  5. All details requested in the questionnaire should be completed strictly respecting the type of stakeholder and the structure of the submission template. The incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Minimum number of words requested should be respected (executive summary 100 words and project information 1500-2000 words/ Word Format).
  6. The project will be counted for the competition if the project description presents one activity and not a list of activities.
  7. All projects submitted to this competition should cover work that is completed or at the end of a major phase in order to provide evidence of results and impact on society.
  8. The deadline for project submission is 1 November 2013. The project submission deadline should be strictly respected. Late submissions will not be accepted.
  9. Projects should be submitted in English only.
  10. Winning projects of the contest WSIS Project Prizes 2012 and 2013 are not eligible to participate in the contest in 2014.

Nomination Criteria

  1. The submission should be complied with rules for project submission. The requested information in the template should respond to all questions and provide detailed information on the goals, timeframe, project’s added value and importance, results and challenges. Minimum number of words requested should be respected (executive summary 100 words and project information 1500-2000 words).
  2. It should highlight the relevance of the project to the respective WSIS Action Line as referenced in the Geneva Plan of Action.
  3. The project description should clearly demonstrate the following:
    • the results achieved and impact generated
    • community empowerment
    • ability of the model to be replicated
    • sustainability of project
    • partnerships development
    • promotion of WSIS values in the Society

Submission phase

The first phase: Submission phase

Phase one will open the call for submissions to the contest of the WSIS Project Prizes 2014. During the period from 5 September until 1 November 2013, all stakeholders are invited to submit WSIS related projects to the contest for WSIS Project Prizes 2014. In order to process the submission, stakeholders are requested to complete the submission form for WSIS Project Prizes 2014 online that contains two parts:

  • Part one: executive summary (100 words) and
  • Part two: project information (1500-2000 words and 1 photo)
  • Submission Form TemplatepdfLogo

Responding to the requests of several stakeholders, the deadline is extended until 15th December 2013 (non-extendable)

The contest is open to all stakeholders, entities representing governments, private sector, international and regional institutions, civil society and academia. Each entity is allowed to submit one project per category. Stakeholders are invited to consult the rules for project submission and nomination criteria on the rules tab.

Nomination phase

The second phase: Nomination phase. The revision of submitted projects by the Expert Group

During phase two, the Expert Group revises the projects referring to the rules for project submission and nomination criteria. The outcome of the Expert Group’s work will be a list of nominated projects that will be announced to the public on 17 February 2014. The Expert Group will consist of professionals working on the implementation of WSIS outcomes. The decisions of the Expert Group are final and without appeal.

All nominated projects will also be part of the WSIS Stocktaking Report 2014. Please see the previous editions: 2012 and 2013

Nominated Projects

Project Title Entity Name Entity Country
Plan of Action for the Information and Knowledge Society in Latin America and the Caribbean (eLAC2015) Comisión Económica para América Latina (CEPAL) International
Digital mapping platform on the internet GEOSYS Algeria
South School on Internet Governance South School on Internet Governance Argentina
E-Public Health Care | Acuario Salud FIT Iberoamerican Foundation of Telemedicine Argentina
Programa de promocion del empleo en teletrabajo Teletrabajo Argentina
Services @ Citizens' Doorsteps Prime Minister's Office (PMO) Bangladesh
Online Micro Small and Medium Enterprise (MSME) Support Service Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) Bangladesh
ICT for Education in Secondary and Higher Secondary Level Project Ministry of Education Bangladesh
Blood Grouping & Information Sharing Project ‘Virtual Blood Data Bank’ Grameen Communications Bangladesh
e-Krishok: Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development (BIID) Bangladesh
Income Generation Project for Farmers using ICT Global Communication Center, Grameen Communications Bangladesh
CH @ SKI Program: The Integration of Bolivia to the digital age Non Governmental Organization Ayni Bolivia Bolivia
Personalized Information System National Health Insurance Fund Bulgaria
Described Video Best Practices for the Canadian broadcasting industry Accessible Media Inc. (AMI) Canada
NFC Mobile Wallet China Telecommunications Corporation China
IPTV Services Deployment with ITU-T H.764 China Telecommunications Corporation China
Redvolción - Empowering youth people through the use of internet Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones Colombia
Soy TIC - Building ICT knowledge for all Colombian population Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones Colombia
En TIC Confío - Promoting a safe and responsible use of Internet among Colombian population Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones Colombia
MiMedellin Medellin Ciudad Inteligente Colombia
Co-creation programme Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones - Dirección Gobierno en línea Colombia
Teletrabajo Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones Colombia
Red de Periodismo de Hoy - ICT Training for journalists Ministerio de Tecnologías de la Información y las Comunicaciones Colombia
ICT space for each rural area Forum Africain pour la Promotion des Nouvelles Technologies de l'Information et de la Communication Congo
AR 3D virtual portal "Giorgio da Sebenico" AR factory Croatia
Nova, Cuban GNU/Linux Distribution University of Informatics Sciences Cuba
Cuba Va Joven Club de Computación y Electrónica (Youth Club of Computing and Electronics Cuba
Creation of the University of Informatics Sciences University of Informatics Sciences Cuba
Joven Club de Computación y Electrónica Joven Club de Computación y Electrónica (Youth Club of Computing and Electronics Cuba
Cubarte, the Portal of Cuban Culture Cubarte, National Center of Informatics in Culture Cuba
Industry-based IT Human Capital Development in Egypt Information Technology Institute (ITI) Egypt
Innovation Competition for Developing Software and Mobile Applications for People With Disabilities Ministry of Communications and Information Technology Egypt
A Cost-effective Cell Phone-based Patient Monitoring and Advising System Wireless Intelligent Networks Center (WINC), School of Communications and Information Technology, Nile University Egypt
Youth Employment Generation Program in Egypt Egypt Information and Communications Technology Trust Fund (ICT-TF) Egypt
Infotech TV Show: Disseminating ICT knowledge through media PHILMON PRESS P.L.C Ethiopia
Creating business and learning opportunities with FOSS Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH Germany
Rural Telephony Project Ghana Investment Fund for Electronic Communications Ghana
Mobile / Remote Revenue Collection and Payment System EKO ICT Ghana
eAgri Transport GO Network Foresight Generation Club Ghana
India Post - Improved Service delivery through the use of ICT Department of Posts India
Perceptual Examination Platform for differently abled Aspirants Cognizant Technology Solutions India
Mobile Based Maternal Health Awareness Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), Hyderabad India
NICT Project Samman - Woman Empowerment Through ICT Network for Information and Computer Technology (NICT) India
India Development Gateway Centre for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), Hyderabad India
Design and Implementation of ICT Measurement System for Iran Information Technology Organization of Iran (ITO) Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Hubco: A window to the New Markets Data Processing Company (Parvaresh Dadeha) Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Research Center for ICT Strategic and International Studies Iran University of Science and Technology Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Paperboy Strillone - Spoken news for visually impaired people... and everyone! ISF Informatici Senza Frontiere Italy
Biosafety Scanner Genetic Rights Foundation Italy
Far Remote Island MCT Project Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications Japan
National Broadband Network Program ministry of information and communications technology Jordan
Support and advocacy for community voices in Arab region Community Media Network Jordan
Enhancing Life with Fibre to the Home FTTH Council MENA Jordan
Government program "Informational Kazakhstan - 2020" National Information Technologies JSC Kazakhstan
Blogs of government agencies executives National Information Technologies JSC Kazakhstan
National Certification Authority of the Republic of Kazakhstan Republican State Enterprise in the capacity of economic conduct “State Technical Service” Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan eGovernment portal National Information Technologies JSC Kazakhstan
E-learning system National Information Technologies JSC Kazakhstan
Information Access Center National Information Society Agency Korea (Rep. of)
Kuwait Information Network The Central Agency for Information Technology Kuwait
Enhancing Information outreach for investor in Kuwait Kuwait Direct Investment Promotion Authority Kuwait
Ministry of State for the National Assembly Ministry of National Assembly Kuwait
Tasdeed Ministry of Finance Kuwait
Kuwait Goverment Online Portal The Central Agency for Information Technology Kuwait
Online Class System (OCS) College of Engineering and Petroleum Online Class System (OCS) Kuwait
Primary Care Information System Ministry of health - KUWAIT Kuwait
Kuwait Official Environmental Portal “Beatona.net” Environment Public Authority Kuwait
Remotely Operable Scanning Electron Microscope Kuwait University, Faculty of Science, Electron Microscopy Unit Kuwait
Al-Babtain Central Library for Arabic Poetry Al-Babtain Central Library for Arabic Poetry Kuwait
u-Pustaka Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission (MCMC) Malaysia
Graphical Password for Mobiles and Tablets arash habibi lashkari Malaysia
Training Digital Leaders Program Knowledge and Information Society Mexico
Centro de Innovación y Educación IMPULSORA DE LA CULTURA Y DE LAS ARTES IAP Mexico
Lazos Sinaloa State Government Mexico
Agylis plus RCAR Morocco
Jaoubnee agoramediacom Morocco
Improving penetration: a success story of augmenting national knowledge society through en-massing digital devices and enabling citizens Information Technology Authority (ITA) Oman
e.oman Digital Strategy: a vision for a country transformation to the new area Information Technology Authority (ITA) Oman
Sultanate of Oman CERT Center (OCERT) Information Technology Authority (ITA) Oman
National Technology Business Entrepreneurship "Sas" Information Technology Authority (ITA) Oman
Sultanate of Oman Educational Portal – gathering administrates, teachers, parents and students in one station Ministry of Education (MoE) Oman
E-Referral System Ministry of Health Oman
Managing human resources at national level - How Oman is managing a huge workforce to supplement its own. Ministry of Civil Service (MoCS) Oman
Inventory of Telecommunications Infrastructure and Broadband Services in Poland Office of Electronic Communications Poland
Memorandum on cooperation for improving the quality of services in the telecommunications market provided to users Office of Electronic Communications Poland
„Electronic Services Platform - the new way of improving customer service in social insurance” Social Insurance Institution (ZUS) Poland
Platform: We support e-business - web.gov.pl Polish Agency for Enterprise Development Poland
Consolidation and centralization customs and tax systems Ministry of Finance Poland
Centros de Inclusão Digital (Digital Inclusion Centers) Programa Escolhas (Choices Programme) Portugal
Educational ecosystem at the municipal level for intergenerational population adaptation to modern ICTs Ministry of Telecom and Mass Communications of the Russian Federation Russian Federation
State Data Interchange System Ministry of Telecom and Mass Communications Russian Federation
Higher Education Degrees’ Verification eService Ministry of Higher Education Saudi Arabia
Leqa'a (video conference system) MINISTRY OF EDUCATION - MOE Saudi Arabia
NIC National Information Center Hub NIC(National Information Center) Saudi Arabia
GOSI Proactive-Services The General Organization for Social Insurance Saudi Arabia
Online Toxicology Analysis Requests & Results System "OTARR" for Integrated Goverment Ministry of Health Saudi Arabia
A'amaly ?????? (My business) Ministry of Commerce and Industry Saudi Arabia
Financial and Administrative Resources Information System- "FARIS" MINISTRY OF EDUCATION - MOE Saudi Arabia
Educational Credential Evaluation Ministry of Higher Education Saudi Arabia
The National e-Training Program Human Resources Development Fund Saudi Arabia
Patients Referral Program "Ehalati" Ministry of Health Saudi Arabia
Safeer Graduates Ministry of Higher Education Saudi Arabia
Nitaqat Ministry of Labor Saudi Arabia
Staff Gate Project TVTC Saudi Arabia
Digital School Ministry of Foreign and Internal Trade and Telecommunications Serbia
Community Knowledge Centre to Empower Educate Econnect Communities Siyafunda Community Technology Centre South Africa
GDCO and Sudan Telecentres: the tools for promoting ICT Gedaref digital city organization (GDCO Sudan) Sudan
Role of GDCO Sudan in e-education Gedaref digital city organization (GDCO Sudan) Sudan
Role of GDCO Sudan Telecentres in e-Agriculture Gedaref digital city organization (GDCO Sudan) Sudan
Interface for Facebook for people with deaf blindness Post och Telestyrelsen (PTS) Sweden
Innovative Collaboration for Development The United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) Switzerland
Telecentre for Disabilities: ICTs for E-Learning of Students with Disabilities Salamieh Telecentre Syrian Arab Republic
International event Ministry of ICT Tunisia
Ensuring Equivalence in Access for Disabled End-Users Information and Communication Technologies Authority (ICTA) Turkey
Life's Simpler with Internet Turkish Ministry of Transport, Maritime Affairs and Communication Turkey
National Transport Portal Ministry of Transport, Maritime Affairs and Communications Turkey
Display of Electromagnetic Field Intensity Measurement Results on Internet Project (Baz Istasyonlari Elektromanyetik Alan Siddeti Ölçüm Sonuçlarinin Internet Ortaminda Yayinlanmasi Projesi) Information and Communication Technologies Authority (ICTA) Turkey
SU ve ATIKSU YÖNETIMI Governments - ISKI General Directorate, Department of Data Processing Turkey
ISKI Water Management Online Information Sharing (WS Technology) Iski Genel Md. Bilgiislem Daire Baskanligi Turkey
The development of IT education in schools in the Odessa region A.S. Popov Odessa National Academy of Telecommunications Ukraine
UAE Mobile Government Telecommunications Regulatory Authority United Arab Emirates
Wide Area Application Services Abu Dhabi Education Council United Arab Emirates
Mohammed Bin Rashid Smart learning project Mohammed Bin Rashid Smart learning project United Arab Emirates
Child Protection Center Mobile Application MoI - Child Protection Centre United Arab Emirates
eMart dubai land department United Arab Emirates
Abu Dhabi Government e-Citizen Program Abu Dhabi Systems & Information Centre (ADSIC) United Arab Emirates
Hadhreen - At Your eService Dubai Electricity & Water Authority United Arab Emirates
Sustain agriculture sector in Abu Dhabi through smart irrigation system Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority United Arab Emirates
Think Science Program Emirates Foundation for Youth Development United Arab Emirates
5th Biennial VGT Conference Ministry of Interior - Child Protection Centre United Arab Emirates
Digital Agenda Uruguay (Uruguay's digital policy) AGESIC ( Agency for e-Government and Information Society) Uruguay
FTTH (Fiber to the Home) Antel (Administración Nacional de Telecomunicaciones) Uruguay
CERTuy AGESIC ( Agency for e-Government and Information Society) Uruguay
“Tus datos valen. Cuidalos” Unit for the Regulation and Control of Personal Data Uruguay
e-Factura – Comprobantes Fiscales Electrónicos (e-Invoice) Dirección General Impositiva Uruguay
Scratch MOOC 4 Teens (SM4T) Universidad ORT Uruguay Uruguay
Electronical Born-Alive Certificate with a unique identification number Office of Planning and Budget – Presidency of the Republic Uruguay
Vía Trabajo - Sistema informático para la gestión de las políticas activas de empleo. National Directorate of Employment (DINAE), Ministry of Labor and Social Security (MTSS) – Uruguay Uruguay
Sistema Nacional de Información Ganadera (SNIG) Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries (MGAP) Uruguay
Electronic Document Handling System "E-Hujjat" State Unitary Enterprise "UNICON.UZ" Uzbekistan
The single portal of interactive public services UZINFOCOM Computerization and IT Developing Center Uzbekistan

Voting phase

The third phase: Public Online Voting

Phase three will provide an online mechanism for all WSIS stakeholders to participate in the contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2014. The list of nominated projects will be announced to the public on 17 February 2014* and WSIS multi-stakeholder community will be invited to participate and cast its vote for one project in each of the 18 categories. The deadline for completing votes is 18 April 2014 (Deadline for casting last vote: 23:00 Geneva time). Winners will be selected based on the appreciation/voting for project descriptions by WSIS stakeholders representing WSIS online network. The rules for voting should be strictly respected.

*All nominated projects are listed here

Prize Ceremony

The fourth phase: Announcement of the winners to the public during WSIS Project Prizes 2014 Ceremony at WSIS+10 High-Level Event 2014

During phase four, the list of the 18 most appreciated/voted projects will be identified and winning projects will be announced officially to the public during the Prize Ceremony, which will be held at the WSIS+10 High-Level Event 2014. Extended descriptions of the winning projects will constitute the basis for the "WSIS Stocktaking: Success Stories 2014". The success stories will showcase examples of projects on the implementation of WSIS outcomes, emphasizing achievements of stakeholders working towards achieving WSIS goals, transferring experience and knowledge at the global level and also spreading WSIS values while fostering them.

The WSIS Project Prizes Ceremony was held on 10th June 2014. More than 140 projects were nominated for the contest 2014 that were made available online for public appreciation. More than 16 000 votes were made by public for the period of two months.

Project descriptions of the winning projects are reflected in the WSIS Stocktaking: Success Stories 2014 report which was released on 10 June.

On 10th June, seventeen winners were announced and awarded prizes in recognition of their outstanding contribution towards strengthening the implementation of Outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS):

  • Ministry of Information Technology and Communications, Colombia
  • Ghana Investment Fund for Electronic Communications, Ghana
  • GEOSYS, Algeria
  • Mohammed Bin Rashid Smart Learning Programme, United Arab Emirates
  • Information Technology Authority, Oman
  • Polish Agency for Enterprise Development, Poland
  • Prime Minister's Office, Bangladesh
  • Ministry of Education, Saudi Arabia
  • Abu Dhabi Systems & Information Centre, United Arab Emirates
  • Centre for Development of Advanced Computing, Hyderabad, India
  • Egypt Information and Communications Technology Trust Fund (MCIT–UNDP), Egypt
  • İSKİ, Turkey
  • Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries, Uruguay
  • Kuwait University, Kuwait
  • Cubarte, National Centre of Informatics in Culture, Cuba
  • Philmon Press P.L.C, Ethiopia
  • Ministry of Higher Education, Scientific Research and Information and Communication Technologies, Tunisia

Blog

The blog was created to share updated information on projects with the ICT for development (ICT4D) community, as well as with those who are working on the World Summit on the Information Society, new applicants of the contest WSIS Project Prizes and also previous winners. For the ICT4D community, it is important to keep abreast with project as they evolve in order to follow-up and to assess how the project is contributing to the implementation of WSIS outcomes and what kind of impact it has on the society. The blog will be an effective medium and a great opportunity to raise awareness about efforts that were undertaken to implement the project and let others know about it. You are strongly encouraged to be part of this blog. Don‘t be afraid to share the project information that you are proud of. In order to post the information about your project, please, provide a short bio and attach a brief article about the results that you achieved and the challenges that you are facing. Please, send it to wsis-stocktaking@itu.int with title article for the blog_wsis

Contact Us

If you have any queries, comments or feedback please do not hesitate to contact our Team.

WSIS Stocktaking
International Telecommunication Union
Place des Nations
CH-1211 Geneva 20
Switzerland

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