WSIS Project Prizes 2015

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Winning Projects
  1. Action Line C1 The role of government and all stakeholders in the promotion of ICTs for development:
    Fight Violence Against Women

    YoungInnovations, Nepal.
  2. Action Line C2 Information and communication infrastructure
    Mexico Conectado: Internet access in schools, hospitals, government offices and other public places
    Ministry of Communications and Transportation, Mexico.
  3. Action Line C3 Access to information and knowledge
    National Portal (Reaching the information-have-nots through National Portal)
    Prime Minister’s Office, Bangladesh.
  4. Action Line C4 Capacity building
    Center of Digital Innovation
    Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, United Arab Emirates.
  5. Action Line C5 Building confidence & security in the use of ICTs
    Security of Energy Systems 
    Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico (RSE), Italy.
  6. Action Line C6 Enabling environment
    Electronic auction for property sale 
    Ministry of Finance, Kazakhstan.
  7. Action Line C7 E-government
    The System of Committees and Councils 
    Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia.
  8. Action Line C7 E-business
    Information System on Consumer Prices (SIPC) 
    Ministry of Economy and Finance, Uruguay.
  9. Action Line C7 E-learning
    Tele-education in 1000 rural Government Schools 
    Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India.
  10. Action Line C7 E-health
    Mobile Health Information System 
    FHI 360, United States of America.
  11. Action Line C7 E-employment
    E-employment Collaboration 
    Ministry of Manpower, Oman.
  12. Action Line C7 E-environment
    Kuwait Official Environmental Portal “Beatona.net” 
    Central Agency for Information Technology, Kuwait.
  13. Action Line C7 E-agriculture
    Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society (ARDYIS) Programme 
    Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation, Netherlands.
  14. Action Line C7 E-science
    E-Science-Net: Universities and Research Network for Science and Technology Development in the Information Society 
    Research Center for ICT Strategic and International Studies, Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran.
  15. Action Line C8 Cultural diversity & identity, linguistic diversity
    Youth Mobilization – Cultural Heritage and Athletic Valorization
    South-West University ‘Neofit Rilski’, Bulgaria.
  16. Action Line C9 Media
    Radio to Improve Production and Marketing for Farmers in Need 
    Radio Farm International, Canada.
  17. Action Line C10 Ethical dimensions of the Information Society
    Tackling Ethical Dimensions of Online Media Content through Self-Regulation 
    Rwanda Media Commission, Rwanda.
  18. Action Line C11 International & regional cooperation
    Plan of Action for the Information Society in Latin America and the Caribbean 
    Economic Commission for Latin America & the Caribbean.

About

WSIS Project Prizes is an immediate response to the requests expressed by WSIS stakeholders during the WSIS Forum 2011: to create a mechanism to evaluate and reward stakeholders for their efforts in the implementation of WSIS outcomes. The WSIS Project Prizes are an integral part of the WSIS Stocktaking Process that was set up in 2004 (Para 120, Tunis Agenda).

The WSIS Project Prizes 2015 contest provides the platform to identify and showcase the success stories and models that could be easily replicated, to empower the community at the local level, to give the chance to everyone to participate in the contest and mainly to recognize the efforts of stakeholders for their added value to society and commitment towards achieving WSIS goals.

The contest of WSIS Project Prizes is open to all stakeholders: governments, private sector, civil society, international organizations, academia and others. The contest comprises 18 categories that are directly linked to the WSIS Action Lines outlined in the Geneva Plan of Action.

Invitation letter:  ar - zh - en - fr - es - ru

The contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2015 is organized into five phases beginning on 15 December 2014. The 18 winners of WSIS Project Prizes will be honored, recognized and presented with an award during WSIS Project Prizes 2015 Ceremony at the WSIS Forum 2015, to be held from 25 to 29 May 2015 in Geneva, Switzerland.

Submit your application for the contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2015 until 25 February 2015!

The United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolution 2014/27 "Assessment of the progress made in the implementation of - and follow up to the outcomes of the World Summit on the Information Society", that reiterates the importance of sharing the best practices at the global level, and while recognizing excellence in the implementation of the projects and initiatives that further the goals of the WSIS, encourages all stakeholders to nominate their projects for the annual WSIS Project Prizes, as an integral part of the WSIS Stocktaking process, while noting the report on the WSIS success stories.


Previous contests

Timeline

The contest is organized into five phases:

Phase I

Submission phase
15 December 2014 - 25 February 2015

Submission of project descriptions. Deadline for last submission: 23:00 Geneva time.

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Phase II

Nomination phase
25 February 2015 - 13 March 2015

The Revision of submitted projects by Expert Group that will result with a list of nominated projects.

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Phase III

Voting phase
13 March 2015 - 1 May 2015

Public online voting. Deadline for casting last vote: 23:00 Geneva time.

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Phase IV

Selection phase
2 May 2015 - 5 May 2015

Selection of winning projects by the Expert Group that will result with a list of winning projects.

Phase V

Announcement of winners

Announcement of winners to the public during WSIS Project Prizes 2015 Ceremony at WSIS Forum 2015, and the release of publication "WSIS Stocktaking: Success Stories 2015", which is a compilation of extended descriptions of the 18 winning projects.

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Submit

Phase I: Submission phase
15 December 2014 - 25 February 2015

Responding to the requests of several stakeholders, the deadline is now extended until 25 February 2015

Phase I will open the call for submissions to the contest of the WSIS Project Prizes 2015. During the period from 15 December 2014 until 25 February 2015, all stakeholders are invited to submit WSIS related projects to the contest for WSIS Project Prizes 2015. In order to process the submission, stakeholders are requested to complete the submission form for WSIS Project Prizes 2015 online that contains two parts:

  • Part one: executive summary (100 words) and
  • Part two: project information (1500-2000 words and 1 photo)
  • Submission Form Sample

The contest is open to all stakeholders, entities representing governments, private sector, international and regional institutions, civil society and academia. Each entity is allowed to submit one project per category. Stakeholders are invited to consult the rules for project submission and nomination criteria on the rules tab.

Nominated Projects

Phase II: Nomination phase
25 February 2015 - 13 March 2015

During Phase II, an Expert Group revised the projects referring to the rules for project submission and nomination criteria. The outcome of the Expert Group’s work was a list of nominated projects listed below. The Expert Group consisted of professionals working on the implementation of WSIS outcomes. The decisions of the Expert Group are final and without appeal.

All nominated projects will also be part of the WSIS Stocktaking Report 2015. Please see the previous edition here.

Nominated Projects
C1. The role of governments and all stakeholders in the promotion of ICTs for development
  • Burkina Open Data Initiative Ministry of Digital Economy , BURKINA FASO
  • Technology towards globalization of graduate education: Graduate Studies Management System (GSMS) Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), MALAYSIA
  • THE DIVIDEND AND HONORARIUM ONLINE APPLICATION MALAYSIAN COOPERATIVE SOCIETIES COMMISSION, MALAYSIA
  • Generalization of Information and Communication Technologies in Education Ministery of National Education and Professional Training, MOROCCO
  • Fight Violence Against Women YoungInnovations Pvt. Ltd. , NEPAL (REPUBLIC OF)
  • Innovations Marshal's Office of the Lodzkie Region, POLAND
  • Universal Service Fund Program Communications and Information Technology Commission, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Basic skills of Computer Applications and e-Transaction Yesser, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Leqa'a (VIDEO CONFERENCE SYSTEM) MINISTRY OF EDUCATION - MOE, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Correspondence Tracking and Electronic Archive Solution Jeddah Minicipality, SAUDI ARABIA
  • The digital portal for touristic accommodation licensing services Saudi Commission of Tourism & Antiques, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Empower Educate Econnect Communities Siyafunda Community Technology Centre, SOUTH AFRICA
  • DNS Entrepreneurship Centre ICANN , SWITZERLAND
  • Geneva Internet Platform Geneva Internet Platform, SWITZERLAND
  • The Effective Use of Fable: Applying ICT Application in Developing National Broadband Infrastructure toward Thailand’s Digital Economy Initiative TOT Public Company Limited, THAILAND

— 15 projects

C2. Information and communication infrastructure
  • portal website by internet or by MENOS system ALGERIAN RADIO, ALGERIA
  • Trans-Eurasian Information Super Highway Trans-Eurasian Information Super Highway (TASIM) Project Secretariat, AZERBAIJAN
  • Kioscos Vive Digital Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • REDONATE Universidad del Norte, COLOMBIA
  • African Internet Exchange System project African Union Commission, ETHIOPIA
  • Introduction of e-Governance in Local Governments Public Service Development Agency of the Ministry of Justice of Georgia, GEORGIA
  • Shiojiri City project Shiojiri City, JAPAN
  • Trans-Eurasia Information Network 4 ByungKyu Kim, KOREA (REP. OF)
  • Environmental Monitoring Information System of Kuwait (eMISK) Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Kuwait Information Network Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Indigenous cellular network infrastructure Redes por la diversidad, equidad y sustentabilidad AC, MEXICO
  • Mexico Conectado: Internet access in schools, hospitals, government offices and other public places Ministry of Communications and Transportation , MEXICO
  • Project Wireless Montenegro Ministry for Information Society and Telecommunications, MONTENEGRO (REPUBLIC OF)
  • Inventory of Telecommunications Infrastructure and Broadband Services in Poland Office of Electronic Communications (UKE), POLAND
  • Life Stories ”N.Iorga” County Library, ROMANIA
  • Provision of universal mobile broadband network in Rwanda using 4G LTE technology Olleh Rwanda Networks Ltd, RWANDA
  • IT Portfolio Management ARABSAT , SAUDI ARABIA
  • (Video Conference System) Ministry of Education, SAUDI ARABIA
  • The National Information Network National Information Center, SUDAN
  • Togolese women, Let us remain connected ZOHOU , TOGO
  • Automated Vehicle Management System Roads and Transportation Authority, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Microsoft 4Afrika: TV White Space (TVWS) Connectivity Microsoft Corporation, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

— 22 projects

C3. Access to information and knowledge
  • WBU's Right to Read Campaign World Blind Union, INTERNATIONAL
  • Global Digital Library on Ethics Globethics.net, INTERNATIONAL
  • The Smart City Gran Concepcion: Open Innovation to Improve Municipal Services in Chile The World Bank, INTERNATIONAL
  • National Portal (Reaching the information-have-nots through National Portal) Prime Minister's Office, BANGLADESH
  • Hello 16123, Krishi Call Centre: A fastest and cheapest agricultural solution in Bangladesh Practical Action Bangladesh, BANGLADESH
  • Interregional Cooperation at Scientific Computing in Interdisciplinary Science South-West University "Neofit Rilski", BULGARIA
  • Global Change Research Data Publishing and Repository Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, CHINA
  • Convertic Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Infomed. Cuban Health Telematics network Cuban National Center of Information on Health Sciences, CUBA
  • Egypt’s ICT Indicators Portal Ministry of Communications and Information Technology , EGYPT
  • Adapting Teaching and Learning Materials for the Blind Adaptive Technology Center for the Blind, ETHIOPIA
  • Choose your Profession Ministry of Sports and Youth Affairs, GEORGIA
  • Public Libraries for Local Development Public Service Development Agency of the Ministry of Justice of Georgia, GEORGIA
  • FuturePolicy.org - Your Online Database of Sustainable Policy Solutions World Future Council, GERMANY
  • CaneInfo..all about Sugarcane Sugarcane Breeding Institute, INDIA
  • Dala2 : Managing the Nation InTech Indonesia, INDONESIA
  • Paperboy Strillone - TTS news for visually impaired people ISF Informatici Senza Frontiere, ITALY
  • Legal reference information system of normative acts «ADILET» Republican center of legal information, KAZAKHSTAN
  • UNEP Live United Nations Envrionment Programme, KENYA
  • School Libraries Outreach Program Kenya National Library Service- Kisumu, KENYA
  • Information Access Center National Information Society Agency, KOREA (REP. OF)
  • Parliamentary Documents Database project Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Library website Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Kuwait Finder Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Transfer of basic information of the Register of Enterprises to the public in the form of open data. The Register ogf Enterprises of the Republic of Latvia, LATVIA
  • First national-scale eGovernment benchmark „Latvia`s e-index” Lattelecom, LATVIA
  • My u-Pustaka : Empowering Mobile Technology to Serve Communities Beyond the Walls of the Library Malaysian Communications and Multimedia Commission, MALAYSIA
  • Amakomaya: Android apps for protecting Pregnant mother and infant babies Yagiten Pvt. Ltd, NEPAL (REPUBLIC OF)
  • The National Information Portal National Center for Statistics and Information, OMAN
  • The Consumer Information Centre of UKE Office of Electronic Communications (UKE), POLAND
  • INVESTMENT ATLAS APPLICATION Saudi Arabian General Investment Authority, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Electronic Control System Majmaah University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Eligibility & Prioritization Mechanism for Housing Subsidy Applications Ministry of Housing, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Safeer Application Ministry of Education, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Rasd Project Ministry of Education ( MOE ), SAUDI ARABIA
  • Business Intelligence ARABSAT, SAUDI ARABIA
  • single sign-on Saudi Electronic University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Saudi Elictronic University Portal Saudi Elictronic University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • MoFA Portal Ministry of Foreign Affairs, SAUDI ARABIA
  • MAS Portal Saudi Commission of Tourism & Antiques, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Biblioteka++ Public Library Dusan Matic Cuprija, SERBIA
  • Star.tt ICT Access Centre Ministry of Science and Technology, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
  • Community Knowledge worker Grameen Foundation-Applab, UGANDA
  • Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon Portal AGEDI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • National Child Helpline, Tanzania C-Sema, UNITED REPUBLIC OF TANZANIA
  • Comprende: "A digital Accesible Media Library" Dicapta, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

— 46 projects

C4. Capacity building
  • African School on Internet Governance Association for Progressive Communications (APC), INTERNATIONAL
  • Teachers Portal for Empowerment Access to Information (a2i) Programme, Prime Minister's Office, BANGLADESH
  • TIC for digital inclusion NGO Ayni Bolivia, BOLIVIA
  • Materials education communication to pupils in Douala-Cameroon Health and Environment Program (HEP), CAMEROON
  • PWDs’ Training and Qualifying for Employment Ministry of Communications and Information Technology, EGYPT
  • Education Development for Universities in Egypt Information Technology Institute (ITI), Egyptian Ministry of Communications and Information Technology , EGYPT
  • Government Community Telecentre (GCT) Programme Department of Communications, FIJI
  • Empowering Communities through Indonesia ICT Volunteer Indonesia ICT Volunteer, INDONESIA
  • Relawan TIK Go To School/IT Volunteer Go to School Relawan TIK Kota Bogor, INDONESIA
  • FAO E-learning Center Cristina Petracchi, ITALY
  • DLSI Digital Literacy for Social Inclusion Informatici Senza Frontiere Onlus, ITALY
  • African Leadership Development in ICT and the Knowledge Society GESCI (Global e-Schools and Communities Initiatives, KENYA
  • Internet Governance Capacity Building Programme DiploFoundation, MALTA
  • Back to school because you learn better familyBack to school because family learns best Biblioteca Victoria Dorantes, MEXICO
  • Youth for a Digital Mexico Digital Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration, MEXICO
  • Puntos México Conectado: Digital innovation and education community centers Ministry of Communications and Transportation, MEXICO
  • GO_PRO! - Regional Programming Centres Association for Non Formal Education "Meritum", POLAND
  • 10 years fostering the digital and media literacy Programa Escolhas (Choices Programme), PORTUGAL
  • "Literacia Inform@tica Para Todos" ("Digital Literacy For Everyone") Biblioteca Municipal de Penalva do Castelo (Câmara Municipal de Penalva do Castelo), PORTUGAL
  • Digital Inclusion Strategy for Qatar Ministry of Information and Communications Technology, State of Qatar (ictQATAR), QATAR
  • Mada – Qatar Assistive Technology Center Mada, QATAR
  • Haseen Ministry of Information and Communication Technology ( ictQATAR) , QATAR
  • Teacher Self-Learning Academy Pan International - Rwanda, RWANDA
  • IT Service Management ARABSAT , SAUDI ARABIA
  • OSCARNet Outreach Social Care Project, SOUTH AFRICA
  • Mae Hong Son IT Valley National Electronic and Computer Technology Center, THAILAND
  • Caribbean ICT Roadshow Caribbean Telecommunications Union, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO
  • Life’s Simpler with Internet TTNET, TURKEY
  • CENTER OF DIGITAL INNOVATION Telecommunication Regulatory Authority, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Empowering with Digital Literacy - Intel® Learn Easy Steps Program Intel Corporation, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

— 30 projects

C5. Building confidence and security in the use of ICTs
  • Commonwealth Approach for Developing National Cybersecurity Strategies Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation, INTERNATIONAL
  • Amigos Conectados Amigos Conectados Project by The Walt Disney Company Latin America and Chicos.net, ARGENTINA
  • En TIC Confío Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Security of Energy Systems Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico – RSE SpA, ITALY
  • International cyber security conference "DSS ITSEC" Data Security Solutions, LATVIA
  • Equipo de Respuesta a Incidentes de Seguridad en Chihuahua Universidad Autónoma de Chihuahua, MEXICO
  • Electronic Signature (e.signature) Digital Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration, MEXICO
  • Practical Guide of the Risks of Cybercrime against Children Islamic Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (ISESCO), MOROCCO
  • Lifelong Learning EdTech Series: CyberSafety and Cyber Security Training Luqcom Informatics, NIGERIA
  • Creating A Safer Digital Environment Through Education (Internet Safety for Kids and Families) Trend Micro Inc., PHILIPPINES
  • Certificates of the President of the Office of Electronic Communication (UKE) Office of Electronic Communications (UKE), POLAND
  • Repository of Resources for Parents Digital Family Telefónica S.A., SPAIN
  • Investigating DNS Abuse/Misuse for Public Safety Community ICANN , SWITZERLAND
  • Combating Spam for Developing Countries Internet Society, SWITZERLAND
  • Smart investigation systems Ministry of labour, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Enhancing Information Security culture at the Ministry of Interior in the United Arab Emirates. Ministry of Interior, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • First African Cyberdrill, for Africa! Zambia Information and Communications Technology Authority (ZICTA), ZAMBIA

— 17 projects

C6. Enabling environment
  • The Commonwealth Cybergovernance Model Commonwealth Telecommunications Organisation, INTERNATIONAL
  • Droits des Consommateurs dans les télécommunications en Afrique ReCATIC, BENIN
  • Apps.co Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Electronic auction for property sale The Committee of State Property and Privatization of the Ministry of Finance of the Republic of Kazakhstan, KAZAKHSTAN
  • Tasdeed Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • ICT Policy for the Federal Public Administration The Office of the Presidency, MEXICO
  • Memorandum on cooperation for improving the quality of services in the telecommunications market provided to users Office of Electronic Communications, POLAND
  • “Development of broadband access in the Russian Federation. Building fiber-optic network for localities with the population of at least 250 people” Ministry of Telecom & Mass Communicaions of the Russian Federation, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
  • Remote Litigation Service Ministry of Justice, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Regulatory Framework for TV White Space Infocomm Development Authority of Singapore, SINGAPORE

— 10 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-government
  • Projet e-Conseil des Ministres Ministry of Digital Economy , BURKINA FASO
  • Circuit informatisé de la depense Ministry of Economy and Finance, BURKINA FASO
  • Circuit Intégré des Financements Extérieurs Ministry of Economy and Finance, BURKINA FASO
  • Ciudadano Confiable: A Web Platform for Democratic Development. PEP: Promoter of Personal Excellence, COLOMBIA
  • Urna de Cristal Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Electronic government procurement E-Commerce Center, KAZAKHSTAN
  • Integrated Information System for Citizen Service Centers Ministry of Investments and Development , KAZAKHSTAN
  • Civil Registry Office Information System Ministry of Justice of the Republic of Kazakhstan , KAZAKHSTAN
  • Single Notary Information System JSC National Information Technologies, KAZAKHSTAN
  • The Public Institution For Social Security Web Portal Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Kuwait Government Online Portal Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • The single state and local government portal The State Regional Development Agency, LATVIA
  • Development of a unified information space for the Ministry of Agriculture and its subordinate affiliates Ministry of Agriculture of Latvia, LATVIA
  • National Preschool Information System Ministry of Education, MALAYSIA
  • Digitization Strategy of Government Services Digital Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration (SFP, by its initials in Spanish), MEXICO
  • Public Service Delivery Electronic Machine Information Technology, Post and Telecommunications Authority, MONGOLIA
  • MASSAR Ministry of Education and Professional Training, MOROCCO
  • e-Complaint Window Public Authority for Consumer Protection, OMAN
  • Oman Educational Portal Ministry of Education , OMAN
  • e-Office (Basic Common Applications) Replication at all Divisions of the Federal Government Ministry of Information Technology, Government of Pakistan, PAKISTAN
  • Integrated Education Management and Recruitment System Zakład Usług Informatycznych OTAGO Sp. z o.o., POLAND
  • Development of Federal Government Information System for Pre-trial Appeal Ministry of Telecom & Mass Communicaions of the Russian Federation, RUSSIAN FEDERATION
  • The system of Committees and Councils Majmaah University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Saudi Tourism Portal Saudi Commission of Tourism & Antiques, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Abshir National Information Center (Ministry Of Interior) , SAUDI ARABIA
  • Safeer Al-Jawwal Ministry of Education, SAUDI ARABIA
  • FINANCIAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE RESOURCES INFORMATION SYSTEM- "FARIS" MINISTRY OF EDUCATION - MOE, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Online Toxicology Analysis Requests & Results System Ministry Of Health, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Electronic Visa Ministry of Foreign Affairs, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Ministry of Finance E-government Services Ministry of Finance, SAUDI ARABIA
  • States Information System National Information Center, SUDAN
  • Full e-Government Project for Rural Locality from scratch Project East Nile Locality , Khartoum state , SUDAN
  • Electronic Correspondence Project MINISTRY OF DEVELOPMENT, TURKEY
  • MOI E-Transformation Project Ministry of Interior, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Smart Statistics Suite Dubai Statistics Center, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • E Auction Emirates Auction, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Maqta Gateway Abu Dhabi Ports, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • GAYSW SMART SERVICES General Authority of Youth and Sports Welfare, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Enterprise GIS Solution National Bureau of Statistics, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Jobs Abu Dhabi (JAD) e-Fair (http://www.efair.ae) - a Virtual Job Fair for Abu Dhabi Abu Dhabi Systems and Information Centre, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Smart Seize Dubai Courts, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Ventanilla Única de Comercio Exterior Ventanilla Única de Comercio Exterior, URUGUAY
  • Designing models for the prioritization and simplification of procedures, change management, communication and monitoring - Uruguay Agency for e-Government and Information Society (AGESIC), URUGUAY

— 43 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-business
  • MiPyme Vive Digital Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Hubco: An e-Commerce Service with ICT Development Impacts on the Businesses of I. R. Iran Data Processing Company (Parvaresh Dadeha), IRAN (ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF)
  • Taw9eel Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • ICT Industry Development Strategy tal Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration (SFP, by its initials in Spanish), MEXICO
  • ISHYIGA SOFTWARE LINES ALGORITHM INC., RWANDA
  • Thaitrade.com: B2B E-Marketplace for Thai SMEs The Department of International Trade Promotion (DITP), THAILAND
  • Information System on Consumer Prices (SIPC) - URUGUAY Ministry of Economy and Finance, URUGUAY

— 8 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-learning
  • IMARK: Maximizing information and knowledge for development Inter American Institute for Cooperation in Agriculture, INTERNATIONAL
  • CtrlF Abderrahim Bourouis , ALGERIA
  • Development of Efficient Electronically-Based Distance Learning System for the training of holders of Master’s Degree in Public Health Medical University - Plovdiv, BULGARIA
  • Youth-led Entreprise and Development Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, CANADA
  • VEduc International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO
  • Supporting e-Learning for Hearing and Visually Impaired Students In Egypt Egypt Information and Communications Technology Trust Fund (ICT-TF), EGYPT
  • Tele-education in 1000 rural Government Schools Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, INDIA
  • etadrees Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Ikraa Ghinwa Jalloul, LEBANON
  • UNIVERSITY PROGRAM 3.0 - THE IMPACT OF THE IMMERSIVE VIRTUAL REALITY AND THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES ON EDUCATION AND MUSEUMS IN NORTHERN MEXICO. UNIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA DE CHIHUAHUA, MEXICO
  • Digital Inclusion and Literacy Pilot Program Office for National Digital Strategy of the Mexican Presidency, MEXICO
  • e-Marking Ministry of Education, OMAN
  • E-learning in prison Instituto Piaget, PORTUGAL
  • The training and communal e-learning project Majmaah University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Learning Managment System Saudi Electronic Univercity , SAUDI ARABIA
  • The National E-Training program Human Resources Development Fund, SAUDI ARABIA
  • GDCO Sudan Telecentres empowering e-Education gedaref digital city organization, SUDAN
  • ICT: E-learning Lopburi Polytechnic College, THAILAND
  • The Development of Computer Games in Order to Support Learning Skills in Basic Scientific Processing kasetsart university, THAILAND
  • ICT for physically and visually challenged students. Ramkhamhaeng University, THAILAND
  • ABNAEE & MALAFEE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Plan Ceibal - Clases de Inglés - Uruguay Plan Ceibal - Centro Ceibal para el Apoyo a la Educación de la Niñez y la Adolescencia, URUGUAY
  • adaptive curriculum for the computer department- Computer Faculty- Sana'a University translated into Electroinc sign language to serve for the deaf student University Educational Center For The Deaf - Sana'a Uni, YEMEN

— 23 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-health
  • Reuse And Mining Health 2.0 Resources Abou Bekr Belkaid University of Tlemcen , ALGERIA
  • Development and installation of a Telemedicine Mobil Station Facultad de Ciencias Médicas UNR- Área de Informática Médica y Telemedicina, ARGENTINA
  • Amader Daktar mPower Social Enterprises Ltd., BANGLADESH
  • mHealth, A Mobile Based Medical Counselling and Health Information Dissemination Service Synesis IT Ltd., BANGLADESH
  • SILAB for Africa Istituto Zooprofilattico dell'Abruzzo e del Molise, "G. Caporale", ITALY
  • Open Hospital - Free rural hospital management console Informatici Senza Frontiere Onlus, ITALY
  • Comprehensive healthcare System (Al-Shifa) Ministry of Health, OMAN
  • e-Prevention in LAC UNIVERSIDAD PERUANA CAYETANO HEREDIA INSTITUTO DE MEDICINA TROPICAL ALEXANDER VON HUMBOLDT, PERU
  • National Telehealth Service Program University of the Philippines Manila – National Telehealth Center, PHILIPPINES
  • RxBox 2 - Advancing Community Healthcare University of the Philippines Manila – National Telehealth Center, PHILIPPINES
  • Electronic Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response Ministry of Health, RWANDA
  • Online Toxicology Analysis Requests & Results System "OTARR" for Integrated Goverment Ministry of Health, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Patients Referral Program Ministry Of Health, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Gezira Family Medicine Project Gezira Family Medicine Project, SUDAN
  • Success Factors in the Adoption of Emergency Health Call Center Graduate School of Management and Innovation (GMI), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi (KMUTT) and TOT Public Company Limited, THAILAND
  • Health Information System for Ministry of Public Health, Thailand Information Communication and Technology of Ministry of Public Health, THAILAND
  • Licensing of Animals and Animal Products for movement within the Kingdom of Thailand (e-movement) Division of Veterinary Inspection and Quarantine (DQIV), THAILAND
  • SenzE : Eye Controlled Communicative Assistive Device for Paralysis Patients Meditech Solution Co.,Ltd., THAILAND
  • FAHAANDA - A Remote Neurological Analysis and Advisory System Cognizant Technology Solutions, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
  • Mobile Health Information System FHI 360, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
  • “Interconnection and Modernization Program of Register and Civil Identification for Physical people and Generation of Information for Vital Statistics in Uruguay” State Evaluation and Management Area (AGEV) - Office of Planning and Budget – Presidency of the Republi, URUGUAY

— 21 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-employment
  • Techno-links for Improved Access and Income Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, CANADA
  • Teletrabajo Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Swavlamban Network for Information and Computer Technology (NICT), INDIA
  • CENTRAL EMPLOYMENT SYSTEM Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Employment Digital Service Digital Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration, MEXICO
  • Program of professional training of persons with acquired higher education Ministry for Information Society and Telecommunications, MONTENEGRO (REPUBLIC OF)
  • E-employment Collaboration Ministry of Manpower, OMAN
  • Electronic Advanced Services for Enterprises Saudi Ministry of Labor (MOL), SAUDI ARABIA
  • Telework Ministry of Labor, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Safeer Graduate Ministry of Education, SAUDI ARABIA
  • myKKU King Khalid University (KKU)- IT Department , SAUDI ARABIA
  • Tamooha ADCB, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

— 12 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-environment
  • WINGO LVSC MEDITERRANEE, ALGERIA
  • Cross Border Implementation of Innovative Cost Cutting Technologies South-West University "Neofit Rilski", BULGARIA
  • Kuwait Official Environmental Portal “Beatona.net” Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Leveraging web and mobile platforms to broadcast disaster alerts. National Digital Strategy, MEXICO
  • Disaster Emergency System based a new approach of network of decision Abdelmalek Essaadi University, MOROCCO
  • Indoor Air Quality in Laboratories Project Majmaah University, SAUDI ARABIA
  • Thailand Best Practice: IT for Environmental Sustainable Development Hydro and Agro Informatics Institute, THAILAND
  • My Garden My City ENVIRONMENT AGENCY OF ABU DHABI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • WATER NETWORK MANAGEMENT SYSTEM ENVIRONMENT AGENCY OF ABU DHABI & ABU DHABI WATER AND ELECTRICITY AUTHORITY , UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

— 9 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-agriculture
  • Free farm management tool. Tambero.com, ARGENTINA
  • Farmer Query System - A Smartphone Application Based Agro-Advisory Service mPower Social Enterprises Ltd., BANGLADESH
  • Krishi Tathyo Service 27676 ( Agri Helpline) Win Miaki Ltd., BANGLADESH
  • Market information for african producers RONGEAD, FRANCE
  • GreenSky India GreenSky India, INDIA
  • eLocust3: real time locust data from desert to decision-makers Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), ITALY
  • Krishi Ghar ICT in Agriculture Nepal, NEPAL (REPUBLIC OF)
  • Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society (ARDYIS) Programme Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation (CTA), NETHERLANDS
  • Smart Accountability in Rwandan Coffee Sector SNV – Netherlands Development Organisation, RWANDA
  • GDCO Sudan Telecentres empowering e-Agriculture gedaref digital city organization, SUDAN
  • Agro Informatics for Community-Based Climate Change Adaptation ๊Utokapat Foundation under H.M. the King's Patronage, THAILAND
  • The Royal Rainmaking Application FONLUANG Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives., THAILAND
  • Database System Development for Comprehensive Management of Dairy Cows Bureau of Biotechnology in Livestock Production, Department of Livestock Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperation, THAILAND
  • Animals Identification and Registration System Abu Dhabi Food Control Authority, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
  • Climate Change Adaptation and ICT FHI 360, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

— 15 projects

C7. ICT Applications: e-science
  • E-Science-Net: Universities and Research Network for Science and Technology Development in the Information Society Research Center for ICT Strategic and International Studies, Iran University of Science and Technology, IRAN (ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF)
  • histonano.com Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Connecting all Higher Learning Institutions and Secondary schools to Broadband via Wi Fi to promote Science and Technology Rwanda Development Board, RWANDA
  • Research Project Management System Majmaah University, SAUDI ARABIA

— 4 projects

C8. Cultural diversity and identity, linguistic diversity and local content
  • Youth Mobilization – Cultural Heritage and Athletic Valorization South-West University "Neofit Rilski", BULGARIA
  • Centro de Relevo Ministry of Information and Communication Technologies, COLOMBIA
  • Papalotero Biblioteca Nacional de Cuba José Martí, CUBA
  • ISA I Speak Again - Free communicator for quadriplegic persons Informatici Senza Frontiere Onlus, ITALY
  • From Graves to Cradles Aureo Anello Associazione, ITALY
  • Project “The Baltic Way Stories” Latvian National Commission for UNESCO , LATVIA
  • Latvia's machine translation service Hugo.lv Culture Information Systems Centre, LATVIA
  • Inclusive information access to social programs Digital Government Unit of the Ministry of Public Administration, MEXICO
  • Arabic Domain Names Journey Communications and Information Technology Commission (CITC)Communications and Information Technology Commission (CITC), SAUDI ARABIA
  • BEL ARABI MOHAMMED BIN RASHID AL MAKTOUM FOUNDATION , UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

— 10 projects

C9. Media
  • Radio to Improve Production and Marketing for Farmers in Need Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada, CANADA
  • Sensoltre - Paintings and sculptures for visually impaired people Informatici Senza Frontiere Onlus, ITALY
  • Nabd - Personalized Arabic Newsreader Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Internetowy Teatr TVP dla szkól / TVP’s Internet Theatre for Schools Telewizja Polska S.A., POLAND
  • Paint a Rainbow Project - Listen to youth voices of Sri Lanka Shilpa Sayura Foundation, SRI LANKA

— 5 projects

C10. Ethical dimensions of the Information Society
  • GSMA Mobile Alliance Against Child Sexual Abuse Content GSMA, INTERNATIONAL
  • Report it, don't ignore it! INHOPE - the International Association of Internet Hotlines, INTERNATIONAL
  • SUPPORT TO ROMA PEOPLE Public library “Fran Galović” in Koprivnica, CROATIA
  • VOILA' for Social Inclusion via WEB De-LAB, ITALY
  • Kuwait Red Crescent Society Website Central Agency for Information Technology, KUWAIT
  • Tackling Ethical Dimensions of Online Media Content through Self-Regulation Rwanda Media Commission (RMC), RWANDA
  • Emerging trends and patterns #[1] - Youth-produced sexual content featuring young people online Internet Watch Foundation, UNITED KINGDOM

— 7 projects

C11. International and regional cooperation
  • Plan of Action for the Information Society in Latin America and the Caribbean ECLAC, CHILE
  • EDUganda Information Technology Institute, EGYPT
  • Pan African e-Network for Telemedicine and Tele-education African Union Commission, ETHIOPIA
  • Promoting Connectivity of Internet Broadband in Prokletije Mountain Border Area Ministry for Information Society and Telecommunications, MONTENEGRO (REPUBLIC OF)
  • Free Our Voices Child helpline International , NETHERLANDS
  • PATENT PROTECTION INITIATIVE UAE Ministry of Economy, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

— 6 projects

Vote

Phase III: Voting phase
13 March 2015 - 1 May 2015

Phase III provides an online mechanism for all WSIS stakeholders to participate in the contest of WSIS Project Prizes 2015. The list of nominated projects is available here. The WSIS multi-stakeholder community is invited to participate and cast its vote for one project in each of 18 categories. To begin voting, click the button below.

Vote

The deadline for completing votes is 1 May 2015 (23:00 Geneva time). The first three most voted projects will be selected based on the appreciation/voting for project descriptions by WSIS stakeholders representing WSIS online network. The rules for voting should be strictly respected.

Prize Ceremony

Phase V: Announcement of winners

During Phase V, the 18 winning projects were announced officially to the public during the Prize Ceremony, which was held at the WSIS Forum 2015 (25-29 May 2015). Extended descriptions of the winning projects constitute the basis for the WSIS Stocktaking: Success Stories 2015. Released at the Prize Ceremony, the success stories report showcases examples of projects on the implementation of WSIS outcomes, emphasizing achievements of stakeholders working towards achieving WSIS goals, transferring experience and knowledge at the global level and also spreading WSIS values while fostering them.

Winning Projects
  1.  C1: Fight Violence Against Women
    YoungInnovations, Nepal.
  2.  C2: Mexico Conectado: Internet access in schools, hospitals, government offices and other public places
    Ministry of Communications and Transportation, Mexico.
  3.  C3: National Portal (Reaching the information-have-nots through National Portal)
    Prime Minister’s Office, Bangladesh.
  4.  C4: Center of Digital Innovation
    Telecommunications Regulatory Authority, United Arab Emirates.
  5.  C5: Security of Energy Systems 
    Ricerca sul Sistema Energetico (RSE), Italy.
  6.  C6: Electronic auction for property sale 
    Ministry of Finance, Kazakhstan.
  7.  C7 E-government: The System of Committees and Councils 
    Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia.
  8.  C7 E-business: Information System on Consumer Prices (SIPC) 
    Ministry of Economy and Finance, Uruguay.
  9.  C7 E-learning: Tele-education in 1000 rural Government Schools 
    Indian Institute of Management Bangalore, India.
  10.  C7 E-health: Mobile Health Information System 
    FHI 360, United States of America.
  11.  C7 E-employment: E-employment Collaboration 
    Ministry of Manpower, Oman.
  12.  C7 E-environment: Kuwait Official Environmental Portal “Beatona.net” 
    Central Agency for Information Technology, Kuwait.
  13.  C7 E-agriculture: Agriculture, Rural Development and Youth in the Information Society (ARDYIS) Programme 
    Technical Centre for Agricultural and Rural Cooperation, Netherlands.
  14.  C7 E-science: E-Science-Net: Universities and Research Network for Science and Technology Development in the Information Society 
    Research Center for ICT Strategic and International Studies, Iran University of Science and Technology, Iran.
  15.  C8: Youth Mobilization – Cultural Heritage and Athletic Valorization
    South-West University ‘Neofit Rilski’, Bulgaria.
  16.  C9: Radio to Improve Production and Marketing for Farmers in Need 
    Radio Farm International, Canada.
  17.  C10: Tackling Ethical Dimensions of Online Media Content through Self-Regulation 
    Rwanda Media Commission, Rwanda.
  18.  C11: Plan of Action for the Information Society in Latin America and the Caribbean 
    Economic Commission for Latin America & the Caribbean.

Categories

The contest comprises the following 18 categories* that are directly linked to the WSIS Action Lines outlined in the Geneva Plan of Action

C1. The role of governments and all stakeholders in the promotion of ICTs for development

The effective participation of governments and all stakeholders is vital in developing the Information Society requiring cooperation and partnerships among all of them.

  1. Development of national e-strategies, including the necessary human capacity building, should be encouraged by all countries by 2005, taking into account different national circumstances.
  2. Initiate at the national level a structured dialogue involving all relevant stakeholders, including through public/private partnerships, in devising e-strategies for the Information Society and for the exchange of best practices.
  3. In developing and implementing national e-strategies, stakeholders should take into consideration local, regional and national needs and concerns. To maximize the benefits of initiatives undertaken, these should include the concept of sustainability. The private sector should be engaged in concrete projects to develop the Information Society at local, regional and national levels.
  4. Each country is encouraged to establish at least one functioning Public/Private Partnership (PPP) or Multi-Sector Partnership (MSP), by 2005 as a showcase for future action.
  5. Identify mechanisms, at the national, regional and international levels, for the initiation and promotion of partnerships among stakeholders of the Information Society.
  6. Explore the viability of establishing multi-stakeholder portals for indigenous peoples at the national level.
  7. By 2005, relevant international organizations and financial institutions should develop their own strategies for the use of ICTs for sustainable development, including sustainable production and consumption patterns and as an effective instrument to help achieve the goals expressed in the United Nations Millennium Declaration.
  8. International organizations should publish, in their areas of competence, including on their website, reliable information submitted by relevant stakeholders on successful experiences of mainstreaming ICTs.
  9. Encourage a series of related measures, including, among other things: incubator schemes, venture capital investments (national and international), government investment funds (including micro-finance for Small, Medium-sized and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs), investment promotion strategies, software export support activities (trade counseling), support of research and development networks and software parks.

 

C2. Information and communication infrastructure

Infrastructure is central in achieving the goal of digital inclusion, enabling universal, sustainable, ubiquitous and affordable access to ICTs by all, taking into account relevant solutions already in place in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, to provide sustainable connectivity and access to remote and marginalized areas at national and regional levels.

  1. Governments should take action, in the framework of national development policies, in order to support an enabling and competitive environment for the necessary investment in ICT infrastructure and for the development of new services.
  2. In the context of national e-strategies, devise appropriate universal access policies and strategies, and their means of implementation, in line with the indicative targets, and develop ICT connectivity indicators.
  3. In the context of national e-strategies, provide and improve ICT connectivity for all schools, universities, health institutions, libraries, post offices, community centres, museums and other institutions accessible to the public, in line with the indicative targets.
  4. Develop and strengthen national, regional and international broadband network infrastructure, including delivery by satellite and other systems, to help in providing the capacity to match the needs of countries and their citizens and for the delivery of new ICT-based services. Support technical, regulatory and operational studies by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and, as appropriate, other relevant international organizations in order to:
    1. broaden access to orbital resources, global frequency harmonization and global systems standardization;
    2. encourage public/private partnership;
    3. promote the provision of global high-speed satellite services for underserved areas such as remote and sparsely populated areas;
    4. explore other systems that can provide high-speed connectivity.
  5. In the context of national e-strategies, address the special requirements of older people, persons with disabilities, children, especially marginalized children and other disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, including by appropriate educational administrative and legislative measures to ensure their full inclusion in the Information Society.
  6. Encourage the design and production of ICT equipment and services so that everyone, has easy and affordable access to them including older people, persons with disabilities, children, especially marginalized children, and other disadvantaged and vulnerable groups, and promote the development of technologies, applications, and content suited to their needs, guided by the Universal Design Principle and further enhanced by the use of assistive technologies.
  7. In order to alleviate the challenges of illiteracy, develop affordable technologies and non-text based computer interfaces to facilitate people's access to ICT.
  8. Undertake international research and development efforts aimed at making available adequate and affordable ICT equipment for end users.
  9. Encourage the use of unused wireless capacity, including satellite, in developed countries and in particular in developing countries, to provide access in remote areas, especially in developing countries and countries with economies in transition, and to improve low-cost connectivity in developing countries. Special concern should be given to the Least Developed Countries in their efforts in establishing telecommunication infrastructure.
  10. Optimize connectivity among major information networks by encouraging the creation and development of regional ICT backbones and Internet exchange points, to reduce interconnection costs and broaden network access.
  11. Develop strategies for increasing affordable global connectivity, thereby facilitating improved access. Commercially negotiated Internet transit and interconnection costs should be oriented towards objective, transparent and non-discriminatory parameters, taking into account ongoing work on this subject.
  12. Encourage and promote joint use of traditional media and new technologies.

 

C3. Access to information and knowledge

ICTs allow people, anywhere in the world, to access information and knowledge almost instantaneously. Individuals, organizations and communities should benefit from access to knowledge and information.

  1. Develop policy guidelines for the development and promotion of public domain information as an important international instrument promoting public access to information.
  2. Governments are encouraged to provide adequate access through various communication resources, notably the Internet, to public official information. Establishing legislation on access to information and the preservation of public data, notably in the area of the new technologies, is encouraged.
  3. Promote research and development to facilitate accessibility of ICTs for all, including disadvantaged, marginalized and vulnerable groups.
  4. Governments, and other stakeholders, should establish sustainable multi-purpose community public access points, providing affordable or free-of-charge access for their citizens to the various communication resources, notably the Internet. These access points should, to the extent possible, have sufficient capacity to provide assistance to users, in libraries, educational institutions, public administrations, post offices or other public places, with special emphasis on rural and under-served areas, while respecting intellectual property rights (IPRs) and encouraging the use of information and sharing of knowledge.
  5. Encourage research and promote awareness among all stakeholders of the possibilities offered by different software models, and the means of their creation, including proprietary, open-source and free software, in order to increase competition, freedom of choice and affordability, and to enable all stakeholders to evaluate which solution best meets their requirements.
  6. Governments should actively promote the use of ICTs as a fundamental working tool by their citizens and local authorities. In this respect, the international community and other stakeholders should support capacity building for local authorities in the widespread use of ICTs as a means of improving local governance.
  7. Encourage research on the Information Society, including on innovative forms of networking, adaptation of ICT infrastructure, tools and applications that facilitate accessibility of ICTs for all, and disadvantaged groups in particular.
  8. Support the creation and development of a digital public library and archive services, adapted to the Information Society, including reviewing national library strategies and legislation, developing a global understanding of the need for "hybrid libraries", and fostering worldwide cooperation between libraries.
  9. Encourage initiatives to facilitate access, including free and affordable access to open access journals and books, and open archives for scientific information.
  10. Support research and development of the design of useful instruments for all stakeholders to foster increased awareness, assessment, and evaluation of different software models and licences, so as to ensure an optimal choice of appropriate software that will best contribute to achieving development goals within local conditions.
C4. Capacity building

Everyone should have the necessary skills to benefit fully from the Information Society. Therefore capacity building and ICT literacy are essential. ICTs can contribute to achieving universal education worldwide, through delivery of education and training of teachers, and offering improved conditions for lifelong learning, encompassing people that are outside the formal education process, and improving professional skills.

  1. Develop domestic policies to ensure that ICTs are fully integrated in education and training at all levels, including in curriculum development, teacher training, institutional administration and management, and in support of the concept of lifelong learning.
  2. Develop and promote programmes to eradicate illiteracy using ICTs at national, regional and international levels.
  3. Promote e-literacy skills for all, for example by designing and offering courses for public administration, taking advantage of existing facilities such as libraries, multipurpose community centres, public access points and by establishing local ICT training centres with the cooperation of all stakeholders. Special attention should be paid to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.
  4. In the context of national educational policies, and taking into account the need to eradicate adult illiteracy, ensure that young people are equipped with knowledge and skills to use ICTs, including the capacity to analyse and treat information in creative and innovative ways, share their expertise and participate fully in the Information Society.
  5. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should create programmes for capacity building with an emphasis on creating a critical mass of qualified and skilled ICT professionals and experts.
  6. Develop pilot projects to demonstrate the impact of ICT-based alternative educational delivery systems, notably for achieving Education for All targets, including basic literacy targets.
  7. Work on removing the gender barriers to ICT education and training and promoting equal training opportunities in ICT-related fields for women and girls. Early intervention programmes in science and technology should target young girls with the aim of increasing the number of women in ICT careers. Promote the exchange of best practices on the integration of gender perspectives in ICT education.
  8. Empower local communities, especially those in rural and underserved areas, in ICT use and promote the production of useful and socially meaningful content for the benefit of all.
  9. Launch education and training programmes, where possible using information networks of traditional nomadic and indigenous peoples, which provide opportunities to fully participate in the Information Society.
  10. Design and implement regional and international cooperation activities to enhance the capacity, notably, of leaders and operational staff in developing countries and LDCs, to apply ICTs effectively in the whole range of educational activities. This should include delivery of education outside the educational structure, such as the workplace and at home.
  11. Design specific training programmes in the use of ICTs in order to meet the educational needs of information professionals, such as archivists, librarians, museum professionals, scientists, teachers, journalists, postal workers and other relevant professional groups. Training of information professionals should focus not only on new methods and techniques for the development and provision of information and communication services, but also on relevant management skills to ensure the best use of technologies. Training of teachers should focus on the technical aspects of ICTs, on development of content, and on the potential possibilities and challenges of ICTs.
  12. Develop distance learning, training and other forms of education and training as part of capacity building programmes. Give special attention to developing countries and especially LDCs in different levels of human resources development.
  13. Promote international and regional cooperation in the field of capacity building, including country programmes developed by the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies.
  14. Launch pilot projects to design new forms of ICT-based networking, linking education, training and research institutions between and among developed and developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
  15. Volunteering, if conducted in harmony with national policies and local cultures, can be a valuable asset for raising human capacity to make productive use of ICT tools and build a more inclusive Information Society. Activate volunteer programmes to provide capacity building on ICT for development, particularly in developing countries.
  16. Design programmes to train users to develop self-learning and self-development capacities.
C5. Building confidence and security in the use of ICTs

Confidence and security are among the main pillars of the Information Society.

  1. Promote cooperation among the governments at the United Nations and with all stakeholders at other appropriate fora to enhance user confidence, build trust, and protect both data and network integrity; consider existing and potential threats to ICTs; and address other information security and network security issues.
  2. Governments, in cooperation with the private sector, should prevent, detect and respond to cyber-crime and misuse of ICTs by: developing guidelines that take into account ongoing efforts in these areas; considering legislation that allows for effective investigation and prosecution of misuse; promoting effective mutual assistance efforts; strengthening institutional support at the international level for preventing, detecting and recovering from such incidents; and encouraging education and raising awareness.
  3. Governments, and other stakeholders, should actively promote user education and awareness about online privacy and the means of protecting privacy.
  4. Take appropriate action on spam at national and international levels.
  5. Encourage the domestic assessment of national law with a view to overcoming any obstacles to the effective use of electronic documents and transactions including electronic means of authentication.
  6. Further strengthen the trust and security framework with complementary and mutually reinforcing initiatives in the fields of security in the use of ICTs, with initiatives or guidelines with respect to rights to privacy, data and consumer protection.
  7. Share good practices in the field of information security and network security and encourage their use by all parties concerned.
  8. Invite interested countries to set up focal points for real-time incident handling and response, and develop a cooperative network between these focal points for sharing information and technologies on incident response.
  9. Encourage further development of secure and reliable applications to facilitate online transactions.
  10. Encourage interested countries to contribute actively to the ongoing United Nations activities to build confidence and security in the use of ICTs.
C6. Enabling environment

To maximize the social, economic and environmental benefits of the Information Society, governments need to create a trustworthy, transparent and non-discriminatory legal, regulatory and policy environment. Actions include:

  1. Governments should foster a supportive, transparent, pro-competitive and predictable policy, legal and regulatory framework, which provides the appropriate incentives to investment and community development in the Information Society.
  2. We ask the Secretary General of the United Nations to set up a working group on Internet governance, in an open and inclusive process that ensures a mechanism for the full and active participation of governments, the private sector and civil society from both developing and developed countries, involving relevant intergovernmental and international organizations and forums, to investigate and make proposals for action, as appropriate, on the governance of Internet by 2005. The group should, inter alia:
    1. develop a working definition of Internet governance;
    2. identify the public policy issues that are relevant to Internet governance;
    3. develop a common understanding of the respective roles and responsibilities of governments, existing intergovernmental and international organisations and other forums as well as the private sector and civil society from both developing and developed countries;
    4. prepare a report on the results of this activity to be presented for consideration and appropriate action for the second phase of WSIS in Tunis in 2005.
  3. Governments are invited to:
    1. facilitate the establishment of national and regional Internet Exchange Centres;
    2. manage or supervise, as appropriate, their respective country code top-level domain name (ccTLD);
    3. promote awareness of the Internet.
  4. In cooperation with the relevant stakeholders, promote regional root servers and the use of internationalized domain names in order to overcome barriers to access.
  5. Governments should continue to update their domestic consumer protection laws to respond to the new requirements of the Information Society.
  6. Promote effective participation by developing countries and countries with economies in transition in international ICT forums and create opportunities for exchange of experience.
  7. Governments need to formulate national strategies, which include e-government strategies, to make public administration more transparent, efficient and democratic.
  8. Develop a framework for the secure storage and archival of documents and other electronic records of information.
  9. Governments and stakeholders should actively promote user education and awareness about online privacy and the means of protecting privacy.
  10. Invite stakeholders to ensure that practices designed to facilitate electronic commerce also permit consumers to have a choice as to whether or not to use electronic communication.
  11. Encourage the ongoing work in the area of effective dispute settlement systems, notably alternative dispute resolution (ADR), which can promote settlement of disputes.
  12. Governments, in collaboration with stakeholders, are encouraged to formulate conducive ICT policies that foster entrepreneurship, innovation and investment, and with particular reference to the promotion of participation by women.
  13. Recognising the economic potential of ICTs for Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises (SMEs), they should be assisted in increasing their competitiveness by streamlining administrative procedures, facilitating their access to capital and enhancing their capacity to participate in ICT-related projects.
  14. Governments should act as model users and early adopters of e-commerce in accordance with their level of socio-economic development.
  15. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should raise awareness of the importance of international interoperability standards for global e-commerce.
  16. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should promote the development and use of open, interoperable, non-discriminatory and demand-driven standards.
  17. ITU, pursuant to its treaty capacity, coordinates and allocates frequencies with the goal of facilitating ubiquitous and affordable access.
  18. Additional steps should be taken in ITU and other regional organisations to ensure rational, efficient and economical use of, and equitable access to, the radio-frequency spectrum by all countries, based on relevant international agreements.
C7. ICT Applications: e-government

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Implement e-government strategies focusing on applications aimed at innovating and promoting transparency in public administrations and democratic processes, improving efficiency and strengthening relations with citizens.
  2. Develop national e-government initiatives and services, at all levels, adapted to the needs of citizens and business, to achieve a more efficient allocation of resources and public goods.
  3. Support international cooperation initiatives in the field of e-government, in order to enhance transparency, accountability and efficiency at all levels of government.
C7. ICT Applications: e-business

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Governments, international organizations and the private sector, are encouraged to promote the benefits of international trade and the use of e-business, and promote the use of e-business models in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
  2. Through the adoption of an enabling environment, and based on widely available Internet access, governments should seek to stimulate private sector investment, foster new applications, content development and public/private partnerships.
  3. Government policies should favour assistance to, and growth of SMMEs, in the ICT industry, as well as their entry into e-business, to stimulate economic growth and job creation as an element of a strategy for poverty reduction through wealth creation.
C7. ICT Applications: e-learning

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

Everyone should have the necessary skills to benefit fully from the Information Society. Therefore capacity building and ICT literacy are essential. ICTs can contribute to achieving universal education worldwide, through delivery of education and training of teachers, and offering improved conditions for lifelong learning, encompassing people that are outside the formal education process, and improving professional skills.

  1. Develop domestic policies to ensure that ICTs are fully integrated in education and training at all levels, including in curriculum development, teacher training, institutional administration and management, and in support of the concept of lifelong learning.
  2. Develop and promote programmes to eradicate illiteracy using ICTs at national, regional and international levels.
  3. Promote e-literacy skills for all, for example by designing and offering courses for public administration, taking advantage of existing facilities such as libraries, multipurpose community centres, public access points and by establishing local ICT training centres with the cooperation of all stakeholders. Special attention should be paid to disadvantaged and vulnerable groups.
  4. In the context of national educational policies, and taking into account the need to eradicate adult illiteracy, ensure that young people are equipped with knowledge and skills to use ICTs, including the capacity to analyse and treat information in creative and innovative ways, share their expertise and participate fully in the Information Society.
  5. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders, should create programmes for capacity building with an emphasis on creating a critical mass of qualified and skilled ICT professionals and experts.
  6. Develop pilot projects to demonstrate the impact of ICT-based alternative educational delivery systems, notably for achieving Education for All targets, including basic literacy targets.
  7. Work on removing the gender barriers to ICT education and training and promoting equal training opportunities in ICT-related fields for women and girls. Early intervention programmes in science and technology should target young girls with the aim of increasing the number of women in ICT careers. Promote the exchange of best practices on the integration of gender perspectives in ICT education.
  8. Empower local communities, especially those in rural and underserved areas, in ICT use and promote the production of useful and socially meaningful content for the benefit of all.
  9. Launch education and training programmes, where possible using information networks of traditional nomadic and indigenous peoples, which provide opportunities to fully participate in the Information Society.
  10. Design and implement regional and international cooperation activities to enhance the capacity, notably, of leaders and operational staff in developing countries and LDCs, to apply ICTs effectively in the whole range of educational activities. This should include delivery of education outside the educational structure, such as the workplace and at home.
  11. Design specific training programmes in the use of ICTs in order to meet the educational needs of information professionals, such as archivists, librarians, museum professionals, scientists, teachers, journalists, postal workers and other relevant professional groups. Training of information professionals should focus not only on new methods and techniques for the development and provision of information and communication services, but also on relevant management skills to ensure the best use of technologies. Training of teachers should focus on the technical aspects of ICTs, on development of content, and on the potential possibilities and challenges of ICTs.
  12. Develop distance learning, training and other forms of education and training as part of capacity building programmes. Give special attention to developing countries and especially LDCs in different levels of human resources development.
  13. Promote international and regional cooperation in the field of capacity building, including country programmes developed by the United Nations and its Specialized Agencies.
  14. Launch pilot projects to design new forms of ICT-based networking, linking education, training and research institutions between and among developed and developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
  15. Volunteering, if conducted in harmony with national policies and local cultures, can be a valuable asset for raising human capacity to make productive use of ICT tools and build a more inclusive Information Society. Activate volunteer programmes to provide capacity building on ICT for development, particularly in developing countries.
  16. Design programmes to train users to develop self-learning and self-development capacities.
C7. ICT Applications: e-health

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Promote collaborative efforts of governments, planners, health professionals, and other agencies along with the participation of international organizations for creating a reliable, timely, high quality and affordable health care and health information systems and for promoting continuous medical training, education, and research through the use of ICTs, while respecting and protecting citizens' right to privacy.
  2. Facilitate access to the world's medical knowledge and locally-relevant content resources for strengthening public health research and prevention programmes and promoting women's and men's health, such as content on sexual and reproductive health and sexually transmitted infections, and for diseases that attract full attention of the world including HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis.
  3. Alert, monitor and control the spread of communicable diseases, through the improvement of common information systems.
  4. Promote the development of international standards for the exchange of health data, taking due account of privacy concerns.
  5. Encourage the adoption of ICTs to improve and extend health care and health information systems to remote and underserved areas and vulnerable populations, recognising women's roles as health providers in their families and communities.
  6. Strengthen and expand ICT-based initiatives for providing medical and humanitarian assistance in disasters and emergencies.
C7. ICT Applications: e-employment

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Encourage the development of best practices for e-workers and e-employers built, at the national level, on principles of fairness and gender equality, respecting all relevant international norms.
  2. Promote new ways of organizing work and business with the aim of raising productivity, growth and well-being through investment in ICTs and human resources.
  3. Promote teleworking to allow citizens, particularly in the developing countries, LDCs, and small economies, to live in their societies and work anywhere, and to increase employment opportunities for women, and for those with disabilities. In promoting teleworking, special attention should be given to strategies promoting job creation and the retention of the skilled working force.
  4. Promote early intervention programmes in science and technology that should target young girls to increase the number of women in ICT carriers.
C7. ICT Applications: e-environment

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Governments, in cooperation with other stakeholders are encouraged to use and promote ICTs as an instrument for environmental protection and the sustainable use of natural resources.
  2. Government, civil society and the private sector are encouraged to initiate actions and implement projects and programmes for sustainable production and consumption and the environmentally safe disposal and recycling of discarded hardware and components used in ICTs.
  3. Establish monitoring systems, using ICTs, to forecast and monitor the impact of natural and man-made disasters, particularly in developing countries, LDCs and small economies.
C7. ICT Applications: e-agriculture

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Ensure the systematic dissemination of information using ICTs on agriculture, animal husbandry, fisheries, forestry and food, in order to provide ready access to comprehensive, up-to-date and detailed knowledge and information, particularly in rural areas.
  2. Public-private partnerships should seek to maximize the use of ICTs as an instrument to improve production (quantity and quality).
C7. ICT Applications: e-science

ICT applications can support sustainable development, in the fields of public administration, business, education and training, health, employment, environment, agriculture and science within the framework of national e-strategies. This would include actions within the following sector:

  1. Promote affordable and reliable high-speed Internet connection for all universities and research institutions to support their critical role in information and knowledge production, education and training, and to support the establishment of partnerships, cooperation and networking between these institutions.
  2. Promote electronic publishing, differential pricing and open access initiatives to make scientific information affordable and accessible in all countries on an equitable basis.
  3. Promote the use of peer-to-peer technology to share scientific knowledge and pre-prints and reprints written by scientific authors who have waived their right to payment.
  4. Promote the long-term systematic and efficient collection, dissemination and preservation of essential scientific digital data, for example, population and meteorological data in all countries.
  5. Promote principles and metadata standards to facilitate cooperation and effective use of collected scientific information and data as appropriate to conduct scientific research.
C8. Cultural diversity and identity, linguistic diversity and local content

Cultural and linguistic diversity, while stimulating respect for cultural identity, traditions and religions, is essential to the development of an Information Society based on the dialogue among cultures and regional and international cooperation. It is an important factor for sustainable development.

  1. Create policies that support the respect, preservation, promotion and enhancement of cultural and linguistic diversity and cultural heritage within the Information Society, as reflected in relevant agreed United Nations documents, including UNESCO's Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity. This includes encouraging governments to design cultural policies to promote the production of cultural, educational and scientific content and the development of local cultural industries suited to the linguistic and cultural context of the users.
  2. Develop national policies and laws to ensure that libraries, archives, museums and other cultural institutions can play their full role of content - including traditional knowledge - providers in the Information Society, more particularly by providing continued access to recorded information.
  3. Support efforts to develop and use ICTs for the preservation of natural and, cultural heritage, keeping it accessible as a living part of today's culture. This includes developing systems for ensuring continued access to archived digital information and multimedia content in digital repositories, and support archives, cultural collections and libraries as the memory of humankind.
  4. Develop and implement policies that preserve, affirm, respect and promote diversity of cultural expression and indigenous knowledge and traditions through the creation of varied information content and the use of different methods, including the digitization of the educational, scientific and cultural heritage.
  5. Support local content development, translation and adaptation, digital archives, and diverse forms of digital and traditional media by local authorities. These activities can also strengthen local and indigenous communities.
  6. Provide content that is relevant to the cultures and languages of individuals in the Information Society, through access to traditional and digital media services.
  7. Through public/private partnerships, foster the creation of varied local and national content, including that available in the language of users, and give recognition and support to ICT-based work in all artistic fields.
  8. Strengthen programmes focused on gender-sensitive curricula in formal and non-formal education for all and enhancing communication and media literacy for women with a view to building the capacity of girls and women to understand and to develop ICT content.
  9. Nurture the local capacity for the creation and distribution of software in local languages, as well as content that is relevant to different segments of population, including non-literate, persons with disabilities, disadvantaged and vulnerable groups especially in developing countries and countries with economies in transition.
  10. Give support to media based in local communities and support projects combining the use of traditional media and new technologies for their role in facilitating the use of local languages, for documenting and preserving local heritage, including landscape and biological diversity, and as a means to reach rural and isolated and nomadic communities.
  11. Enhance the capacity of indigenous peoples to develop content in their own languages.
  12. Cooperate with indigenous peoples and traditional communities to enable them to more effectively use and benefit from the use of their traditional knowledge in the Information Society.
  13. Exchange knowledge, experiences and best practices on policies and tools designed to promote cultural and linguistic diversity at regional and sub-regional levels. This can be achieved by establishing regional, and sub-regional working groups on specific issues of this Plan of Action to foster integration efforts.
  14. Assess at the regional level the contribution of ICT to cultural exchange and interaction, and based on the outcome of this assessment, design relevant programmes.
  15. Governments, through public/private partnerships, should promote technologies and R&D programmes in such areas as translation, iconographies, voice-assisted services and the development of necessary hardware and a variety of software models, including proprietary, open source software and free software, such as standard character sets, language codes, electronic dictionaries, terminology and thesauri, multilingual search engines, machine translation tools, internationalized domain names, content referencing as well as general and application software.
C9. Media

The media — in their various forms and with a diversity of ownership — as an actor, have an essential role in the development of the Information Society and are recognized as an important contributor to freedom of expression and plurality of information.

  1. Encourage the media - print and broadcast as well as new media - to continue to play an important role in the Information Society.
  2. Encourage the development of domestic legislation that guarantees the independence and plurality of the media.
  3. Take appropriate measures - consistent with freedom of expression - to combat illegal and harmful content in media content.
  4. Encourage media professionals in developed countries to establish partnerships and networks with the media in developing ones, especially in the field of training.
  5. Promote balanced and diverse portrayals of women and men by the media.
  6. Reduce international imbalances affecting the media, particularly as regards infrastructure, technical resources and the development of human skills, taking full advantage of ICT tools in this regard.
  7. Encourage traditional media to bridge the knowledge divide and to facilitate the flow of cultural content, particularly in rural areas.
C10. Ethical dimensions of the Information Society

The Information Society should be subject to universally held values and promote the common good and to prevent abusive uses of ICTs.

  1. Take steps to promote respect for peace and to uphold the fundamental values of freedom, equality, solidarity, tolerance, shared responsibility, and respect for nature.
  2. All stakeholders should increase their awareness of the ethical dimension of their use of ICTs.
  3. All actors in the Information Society should promote the common good, protect privacy and personal data and take appropriate actions and preventive measures, as determined by law, against abusive uses of ICTs such as illegal and other acts motivated by racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance, hatred, violence, all forms of child abuse, including paedophilia and child pornography, and trafficking in, and exploitation of, human beings.
  4. Invite relevant stakeholders, especially the academia, to continue research on ethical dimensions of ICTs.
C11. International and regional cooperation

International cooperation among all stakeholders is vital in implementation of this plan of action and needs to be strengthened with a view to promoting universal access and bridging the digital divide, inter alia, by provision of means of implementation.

  1. Governments of developing countries should raise the relative priority of ICT projects in requests for international cooperation and assistance on infrastructure development projects from developed countries and international financial organizations.
  2. Within the context of the UN's Global Compact and building upon the United Nations Millennium Declaration, build on and accelerate public-private partnerships, focusing on the use of ICT in development.
  3. Invite international and regional organizations to mainstream ICTs in their work programmes and to assist all levels of developing countries, to be involved in the preparation and implementation of national action plans to support the fulfilment of the goals indicated in the declaration of principles and in this Plan of Action, taking into account the importance of regional initiatives.

*WSIS Action Line C7 is separated into 8 individual categories in-line with the ICT applications sectors.

Rules and Guidelines

Rules and guidelines for submission phase
  1. All projects must be submitted through the online questionnaire.
  2. For each project submission only one category should be selected, out of 18 categories.
  3. Each entity could submit one project per each category
  4. The same project may not be submitted twice.
  5. All details requested in the questionnaire should be completed strictly respecting the type of stakeholder and the structure of the submission template. The incomplete submissions will not be accepted. Minimum number of words requested should be respected (executive summary 100 words and project information 1500-2000 words/ Word Format).
  6. The project will be counted for the competition if the project description presents one activity and not a list of activities.
  7. All projects submitted to this competition should cover work that is completed or at the end of a major phase in order to provide evidence of results and impact on society.
  8. The project submission deadline should be strictly respected. Late submissions will not be accepted.
  9. Projects should be submitted in English only.
  10. Winning projects of previous WSIS Project Prizes contests are not eligible to participate in the contest.

Nomination Criteria
  1. The submission should be complied with rules for project submission. The requested information in the template should respond to all questions and provide detailed information on the goals, timeframe, project’s added value and importance, results and challenges. Minimum number of words requested should be respected (executive summary 100 words and project information 1500-2000 words).
  2. It should highlight the relevance of the project to the respective WSIS Action Line as referenced in the Geneva Plan of Action.
  3. The project description should clearly demonstrate the following:
    • the results achieved and impact generated
    • community empowerment
    • ability of the model to be replicated
    • sustainability of project
    • partnerships development
    • promotion of WSIS values in the Society

Rules and guidelines for voting phase
  1. The first three most voted projects are selected based on the appreciation/voting of projects by WSIS stakeholders representing WSIS online network. The stakeholders are invited to appreciate/vote for projects in all 18 categories.
  2. Only registered members of the WSIS Stocktaking Platform (STK) with requested complete information may vote for/appreciate a project. The information should contain organization details: name, type, country and user details: username and e-mail
  3. Entities are not allowed to vote for/appreciate their own project
  4. Votes/appreciations of all STK members are weighted equally
  5. Each STK member may only vote for/appreciate one project in each category
  6. Stakeholders should complete the voting process by voting in each category (in total 18)
  7. WSIS Stocktaking reserves the right to use the entity (organization) details submitted by stakeholders